Category: Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN)

June 16, 2017

Fly-Egg Profiling Method Reveals a Corpse’s ‘Time of Death’ Faster

By Louisa Dalton, for C&EN

Carrion insects are the stopwatches of death investigations. Within minutes of a body becoming a corpse, blow flies arrive. Forensic researchers have well-calibrated knowledge of different blow fly species’ growth rates and arrival order, so correctly identifying the species found on a corpse can help establish time of demise to within hours. However, the eggs […]

June 15, 2017

Thirsty MOF Sucks More Water from Air

By XiaoZhi Lim, for C&EN

Materials that reversibly trap water from air could provide a vital source of drinking water in areas where it is scarce, or offer energy-efficient air conditioning. But to be commercially viable, these materials need a large water capacity and low energy requirements during water adsorption and desorption. Now, Mircea Dincă and his research group at […]

June 2, 2017

Genetic Engineering Through Click Chemistry

By Alla Katsnelson, for C&EN

Gene therapy and a range of biological research rely on the efficient delivery of nucleic acids into cells through the process known as transfection. Most widely-used transfection approaches for mammalian cells rely on electrostatic forces, usually taking advantage of cationic reagents to bind to negatively-charged nucleic acids and form strong ionic complexes. Cells then grab […]

June 1, 2017

Artificial Melanin Gets into the Skin

By Wudan Yan, for C&EN

Melanin is the pigment responsible for human skin and hair color—and it helps protect skin cells from sun damage by absorbing ultraviolet rays and scavenging free radicals. Attempting to reproduce these properties, researchers have demonstrated that nanoparticles made with artificial melanin can protect cultured skin cells from UV radiation. The research serves as an important […]

May 23, 2017

Very Low Lead Exposure May Endanger Eagles

By Deirdre Lockwood for C&EN

Even extremely low levels of lead may hamper the flight and movement of golden eagles, a new study in Sweden shows. The findings add fuel to a debate over the use of lead ammunition in hunting, the main source of lead to the birds. Eagles and other scavengers can be poisoned by eating carcasses that […]

May 18, 2017

Get to Know C&EN Global Enterprise

By Andrew Clinton

  C&EN Global Enterprise is now available to ACS Publications’ institutional subscribers. It delivers C&EN content on the same award-winning web platform as ACS journals. Watch an overview of C&EN Global Enterprise: C&EN Global Enterprise is a lasting digital version of C&EN’s award-winning magazine that advances the reader’s experience and adds new capabilities requested by […]

May 16, 2017

Stretchy Holograms Made from a Metamaterial

By Katherine Bourzac for C&EN

 Holograms record and display realistic three-dimensional images that appear to float over a surface. One day they might be used to immerse viewers in virtual worlds or simply provide ultra-realistic video calls—that is, if the holographic images could be made to move. Now researchers have created holograms that display different two-dimensional images when stretched. Although […]

May 15, 2017

3 Tips to Help You Get an Academic Faculty Job

By Susan Morrissey

Adapted from the eBook, “10 Tips to Help You Get a Faculty Job,” published by Chemical & Engineering News. Every year, numerous graduate students and postdocs apply for academic faculty jobs in hopes of securing an on-campus panel interview. After being selected as a candidate, you must convince a panel of established professors that you have […]

May 11, 2017

Making Antibodies Minus the Cells

By Erika Gebel Berg for C&EN

In the development of protein therapeutics, optimizing the interaction between the drug and its target is only half the battle. Drug developers often tweak the protein’s underlying DNA sequence and conduct time-consuming screens to identify the variants that give the highest yields when expressed in cells. Now, researchers have developed a cell-free protein synthesis platform […]

May 11, 2017

Dolphin Breath Holds Chemical Clues to Disease

By Deirdre Lockwood for C&EN

Certain molecules in the breath of dolphins exposed to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill correlate with signs of respiratory illness, a new study shows. The findings give researchers a set of biomarkers that could help assess the health of wild dolphins and other marine mammals using relatively noninvasive breath analysis. During veterinary exams on […]

April 26, 2017

Spray-on Process Creates Bright, Efficient LEDs

By Prachi Patel for C&EN

Researchers have developed a process to make light-emitting diodes by spraying a substrate with quantum dots, according to a paper published in ACS Photonics. The quantum-dot LEDs (QLEDs) are 100 times as bright and efficient as similar devices, the researchers say. The process could someday be used to mass-produce inexpensive, vibrant, and flexible displays. Quantum dots […]

March 30, 2017

C&EN Roundup: Fish-Inspired Oil Filters, Improvement to Dental Fillings, and the Secrets of Artwork Revealed by Chemistry

By Jesse Stanchak

Chemical & Engineering News covers the world of chemistry, from research and education to business and policy. Here’s a sampling of their coverage of research from ACS journals: *** Peptide-laced Nanofibers Could Help Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Researchers developed a material capable of blocking bacteria’s ability to infect tissue without destroying the bacteria in the process. […]

March 10, 2017

Saying Goodbye to Nobel Prize-Winner George A. Olah (1927-2017)

By Jesse Stanchak

The chemistry community said goodbye to one of its leading lights this week, as George A. Olah died at the age of 89. Throughout his long career he earned many of chemistry’s highest honors, including the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1994 for his work on preparing long-lived carbocations using superacids. In 2005, he was […]

February 21, 2017

Q&A: ACS Omega’s Krishna Ganesh on the Future of Indian Research Funding

By Jesse Stanchak

The Indian government’s recently unveiled 2017-2018 budget includes increased levels of public funding for research in a variety of disciplines. Yet, as C&EN reports, some Indian scientists are saying the new budget does not go far enough to support Indian research. One of those researchers is Krishna Ganesh, a chemistry professor, director of the Indian […]

  • India

February 1, 2017

C&EN Roundup: Controlling Pain With Light, Printing With Nanoparticle Ink, and Studying Human-Plant Hybrid Cells

By Jesse Stanchak

Chemical & Engineering News covers the world of chemistry, from research and education to business and policy. Here’s a sampling of their coverage of research from ACS journals: *** Nanoparticle Ink Opens Up New Printing Possibilities Researchers have found a way to add iridescent colors to nanopatterned polymer sheets using ink containing silver nanoparticles. An […]

January 12, 2017

C&EN Global Enterprise Offers Exciting New Features for Library Subscribers

By Angela Carlson

C&EN is one of the most trusted sources for objective science news, written by the experts: In order to reflect C&EN’s transition to a digital-first publication, ACS is launching C&EN Global Enterprise, designed specifically for institutional subscribers. It features all of the content found in the magazine—from cover to cover—in a highly discoverable web and […]

October 28, 2016

C&EN Roundup: Stronger Silk, Nanobot Drug Delivery, and Mercury Leaks

By Jesse Stanchak

Chemical & Engineering News covers the world of chemistry, from research and education to business and policy. Here’s a sampling of their coverage of research from ACS journals: *** Sea Life Untainted by Wrecked WWII Submarine’s Mercury Leak Researchers say metallic mercury leaking from a World War II German submarine wreck has polluted ocean floor […]

  • C&EN

October 3, 2016

Autophagy Researcher Yoshinori Ohsumi Wins the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

By Jesse Stanchak

In recognition of his research into autophagy, the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine goes to Yoshinori Ohsumi. The Tokyo Institute of Technology biologist won the prize for his research into the mechanisms cells use to break down and reuse their own components. The autophagy process is an essential part of maintaining cell health, as […]

  • autophagy
  • Nobel Prize

August 24, 2016

C&EN Roundup: Thyroid Disruptions, Drug Discovery, and Flexible Crystals

By Jesse Stanchak

Chemical & Engineering News covers the world of chemistry, from research and education to business and policy. Here’s a sampling of their coverage of research from ACS journals: *** Flint Water Crisis May Also Be Responsible For Legionnaires’ Outbreaks Two recent outbreaks of Legionnaires’ disease in Flint, Mich., may be the result of the city’s […]

  • C&EN News

August 3, 2016

Remembering Ahmed Zewail (1946-2016)

By Jesse Stanchak

Ahmed Zewail, winner of the 1999 Nobel Prize and the 2011 Priestley Medal, is dead at the age of 70. The former associate editor of The Journal of Physical Chemistry and former Linus Pauling Professor of chemistry and professor of physics at the California Institute of Technology leaves behind a legacy of groundbreaking science and […]

  • Ahmed Zewail
  • Nobel Prize
  • Priestley Medal

July 25, 2016

Get Ready for C&EN’s Talented 12 of 2016

By Sondra Hadden

Last year, C&EN debuted a new take on the state of the chemistry enterprise: by highlighting 12 path-paving young researchers and entrepreneurs that are set to change the face of the industry and solve global problems. The inaugural group was seeking ways to synthesize molecules in a more environmentally friendly way, developing methods to curb global […]

  • Talented 12

July 14, 2016

C&EN Roundup: Sulfur Batteries, 3D Printed Placentas and Nuclear Waste Recycling

By Jesse Stanchak

Chemical & Engineering News covers the world of chemistry, from research and education to business and policy. Here’s a sampling of their coverage of research from ACS journals: *** 3D Printed Placenta Model Could Improve Preeclampsia Studies Researchers have created a three-dimensional bioprinted placenta model to aid in the study of preeclampsia. Placentas play a […]

  • antibacterial
  • batteries
  • climate change
  • landfill mining
  • nanoparticles
  • nuclear waste
  • pregnancy

May 26, 2016

C&EN Roundup: Storing Natural Gas, a Nanowire Battery and a Vaccine for Meth

By Jesse Stanchak

Chemical & Engineering News covers the world of chemistry, from research and education to business and policy. Here’s a sampling of their coverage of research from ACS journals: *** New Storage Technique Could Make Natural Gas More Convenient Sealing natural gas in porous beads with hydrocarbon plugs could allow the fuel to be transported in compact, affordable […]

  • batteries
  • cell probes
  • medical testing
  • methamphetamine
  • natural gas

May 2, 2016

C&EN Roundup: Spotting Counterfeit Honey, Flexible LEDs, and Fighting Climate Change with Bubbles

By Jesse Stanchak

Chemical & Engineering News covers the world of chemistry, from research and education to business and policy. Here’s a sampling of their coverage of research from ACS journals: *** Building a Better Flexible Display With Nanowires Flexible electronic displays have a variety of applications, but the organic light-emitting diodes used in many displays tend to wear […]

  • ACS Nano
  • ACS Photonics
  • ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering
  • climate change
  • EKG patches
  • Environmental Science & Technology
  • honey
  • Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
  • light bulbs

April 8, 2016

The vision behind C&EN’s new design

By Jesse Stanchak

Whether you’re a longtime reader or a new fan, you can’t help but notice that C&EN has a new look these days. But what prompted the redesign? And what’s next for the venerable publication? We sat down with C&EN Managing Editor Amanda Yarnell to find out. How did C&EN realize it was time for a change?  […]

  • Amanda Yarnell
  • C&EN
  • magazine

March 30, 2016

C&EN Roundup: Detecting Antibodies, Improving Batteries and Testing Beer

By Jesse Stanchak

Chemical & Engineering News covers the world of chemistry, from research and education to business and policy. Here’s a sampling of their coverage of research from ACS journals: *** New Test May Be Able to Detect Antibodies in Saliva Detecting antibodies for a given illness can be a useful way of diagnosing a patient, but even the […]

  • ACS Central Science
  • ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering
  • Analytical Chemistry
  • antibodies
  • batteries
  • beer
  • biofuels
  • Chemical Research in Toxicology
  • medicine
  • Nano Letters

February 25, 2016

C&EN Roundup: Ultralow-Power Computing, CO2 Capture, and Combat Zone Treatments

By Jesse Stanchak

Chemical & Engineering News covers the world of chemistry, from research and education to business and policy. Here’s a sampling of their coverage of research from ACS journals: *** Nanoparticle Clotting Agent Could Save Soldiers, Even in Extreme Heat An injectable blood-clotting agent can save a wounded soldier’s life, but the extreme temperatures common in many combat […]

  • ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering
  • ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering
  • ACS Synthetic Biology
  • C&EN
  • Journal of Proteome Research
  • Nano Letters

January 25, 2016

C&EN Roundup: Volkswagen Emissions, Cyanobacteria Toxins and Calcium-Ion Batteries

By Jesse Stanchak

Chemical & Engineering News covers the world of chemistry, from research and education to business and policy. Here’s a sampling of their coverage of research from ACS journals: *** Volkswagen emissions deception may have cost $430 million and 46 lives Volkswagen provoked plenty of outrage from consumers when it was revealed last year that nearly 600,000 […]

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Bioconjugate Chemistry
  • Calcium-ion batteries
  • Chemical and Engineering News
  • Chemistry of Materials
  • Environmental Science and Technology
  • Volkswagen

January 16, 2016

C&EN: A Vital News Service for Chemists

By Mark Fraser

Since 1923, Chemical and Engineering News has served as the most trusted primary news source for information on the latest developments and technology for chemists worldwide. Now, Watch Glass is showcasing some of those ground-breaking discoveries. What’s more, you can access it for free… For over 90 years, the weekly periodical Chemical and Engineering News […]

October 19, 2015

Celebrate National Chemistry Week with the Journal of Chemical Education

By Freddy Tellez

From the moment you open your eyes, you are surrounded by color. From the food we eat, to the clothes we wear, to the paintings that decorate our walls, chemistry colors our world. National Chemistry Week is October 18–24, 2015. This year’s theme, “Chemistry Colors Our World,” explores the chemistry of dyes, pigments, and light. […]

  • C&EN
  • Journal of Chemical Education
  • National Chemistry Week

October 6, 2015

ACS Congratulates the 2015 Nobel Laureates in Physics

By Selenah Njoloma

       Congratulations to Takaaki Kajita in Japan and ACS author Arthur B. McDonald in Canada, who were awarded the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics for their discovery that neutrinos have mass.  Takaaki Kajita discovered that neutrinos change identities on their way to the Super-Kamiokande detector in Japan. Arthur B. McDonald showed that neutrinos from the […]

  • ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
  • C&EN
  • Nobel

October 5, 2015

Infectious Disease Research Receives Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine

By Renee John

         Congratulations to ACS Authors William C. Campbell and Satoshi Ōmura, who were awarded one half of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries concerning a novel therapy against infections caused by roundworm parasites. The researchers developed Ivermectin and Avermectin, drugs that cure diseases caused by parasitic roundworms, […]

  • ACS Infectious Diseases
  • C&EN
  • Chemical Reviews
  • Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
  • Nobel

October 5, 2015

Celebrating the International Year of Light

By Angela Walker

In 2015, scientists and engineers across the world have united to celebrate the International Year of Light, dedicated to showcasing the significant role of optical sciences in energy, education, agriculture, communications, and health. In celebration of the International Year of Light, ACS journals: ACS Photonics, ACS Nano, Nano Letters, Langmuir, and C&EN will host a […]

  • ACS Photonics
  • C&EN
  • International Year of Light

September 30, 2015

Who Will Win the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry? Take a Guess with ACS Experts

By Selenah Njoloma

It’s Nobel season—science’s “Super Bowl and the Oscars wrapped in to one,” says Lauren Wolf, head of the science and technology group at Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), ACS’ weekly newsmagazine. Between October 5 and 12, the Nobel committee will award prizes to scientists, thinkers, and leaders whose work has changed humankind. And like those […]

  • C&EN
  • Chemistry of Materials
  • Nobel

September 18, 2015

Testing Old Tapes For Playability

By Katherine Gammon

Audio recordings are a huge part of the world’s cultural history—and some are in danger of degrading so much that they’ll be lost forever. Now researchers report that infrared spectroscopy offers a quick, noninvasive way to separate magnetic tapes that can still be played from those that can’t. This could help archivists know which tapes […]

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • C&EN

September 9, 2015

C&EN Virtual Symposium Keynote Q&A with Christopher P. Austin, M.D.

By Sondra Hadden

On September 16, 2015, scientists from biotech, pharma and academia will present the latest research findings and new technologies that are driving the design, discovery and development of new drugs – from traditional small molecules and biologics to cutting-edge gene-editing and immunological technologies. Speakers will present the latest advances in identifying promising drug targets, verifying […]

  • C&EN
  • Drug Development
  • Drug Discovery
  • Researcher

August 14, 2015

CHEMOJI – A new Chemistry Keyboard from the American Chemical Society

By Sondra Hadden

We here at the American Chemical Society like texting our friends from the lab or library as much as you do! Let your crew know you’re working late in the lab, tell everyone your paper was accepted by JACS, and send your PI a research update with your very own chemistry emoji set by downloading […]

  • Authors
  • C&EN
  • CAS
  • Chemoji
  • JACS
  • Multimedia
  • Researchers