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Nano Letters’ Charles Lieber Wins 2017 Von Hippel Award

Nano Letters Co-Editor, Charles M. Lieber is the 2017 recipient of the prestigious Von Hippel Award, from the Materials Research Society. The Society’s highest honor, the Von Hippel Award recognizes those qualities most prized by materials scientists and engineers: brilliance and originality of intellect, combined with vision that transcends the boundaries of conventional scientific disciplines.

Professor Lieber is honored “for pioneering contributions to nanoscience, defining the foundations of rational synthesis of nanoscale wires, characterization of their fundamental physical properties, and the development of applications of these materials in chemistry, biology and medicine.”

As the 2017 recipient of the Von Hippel Award, Professor Lieber joins his Nano Letters co-Editor A. Paul Alivisatos, who received the Award in 2011.

The Award will be conferred on Wednesday, November 30 during the MRS Awards Ceremony, after which Professor Lieber will give the Von Hippel Award Talk on Nanowires, Nanoelectronics and Revolutionary Tools for Brain Science.

Lieber has authored of over 100 articles, including top-cited works from ACS such as:

Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Nanowires for Three-Dimensional, Multifunctional Electronics
Nano Lett., 2007, 7 (3), pp 773–777
DOI: 10.1021/nl063056l

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Single and Tandem Axial p-i-n Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices
Nano Lett., 2008, 8 (10), pp 3456–3460
DOI: 10.1021/nl8023438
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Ultrathin Au Nanowires and Their Transport Properties
J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130 (28), pp 8902–8903
DOI: 10.1021/ja803408f
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Coaxial Group III−Nitride Nanowire Photovoltaics
Nano Lett., 2009, 9 (5), pp 2183–2187
DOI: 10.1021/nl900858v
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InAs/InP Radial Nanowire Heterostructures as High Electron Mobility Devices
Nano Lett., 2007, 7 (10), pp 3214–3218
DOI: 10.1021/nl072024a
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Dopant-Free GaN/AlN/AlGaN Radial Nanowire Heterostructures as High Electron Mobility Transistors
Nano Lett., 2006, 6 (7), pp 1468–1473
DOI: 10.1021/nl060849z
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Subthreshold Regime has the Optimal Sensitivity for Nanowire FET Biosensors
Nano Lett., 2010, 10 (2), pp 547–552
DOI: 10.1021/nl9034219
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Graphene and Nanowire Transistors for Cellular Interfaces and Electrical Recording
Nano Lett., 2010, 10 (3), pp 1098–1102
DOI: 10.1021/nl1002608
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Single p-Type/Intrinsic/n-Type Silicon Nanowires as Nanoscale Avalanche Photodetectors
Nano Lett., 2006, 6 (12), pp 2929–2934
DOI: 10.1021/nl062314b
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Si/a-Si Core/Shell Nanowires as Nonvolatile Crossbar Switches
Nano Lett., 2008, 8 (2), pp 386–391
DOI: 10.1021/nl073224p
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Read more about Charles Lieber and his research.

Find out more about Nano Letters.

Nominations are open for the 2017 Nano Letters Young Investigator Lectureship.
Nominate an accomplished colleague today!

Discover the 7 Habits of Productive Scientists

Do you often find yourself busy but not very productive? Do you struggle with deadlines or fumble your way through projects? Maybe you have a lot of great ideas but don’t have time to execute them. If that’s the case, maybe you need to adopt some of the productivity secrets of ACS Publications Editors-in-Chief. George Schatz, Editor-in-Chief of The Journal of Physical Chemistry and Vince M. Rotello, Editor-in-Chief of Bioconjugate Chemistry, recently shared their tips for staying on task and getting great things done in the lab. Read on to discover their insights:

Break Projects Into Manageable Tasks

“It is a crucial skill for researchers to work systematically to ensure they make progress on a regular basis for research projects,” says Schatz. He suggests students start each day listing out the tasks they need to accomplish. Even though this might sound simple, it is a critical step toward completing an ambitious project. A productive researcher must possess the skills to identify and prioritize important tasks within a project, as well as the discipline to meet the daily goals they set.

Set to Priorities to Avoid Distractions

“Once a reasonable goal is set,” Schatz says, “one ought not to get distracted by extraneous things.”

You only have 24 hours a day, so staying on-task is critical. Distraction is everywhere and takes many forms. The first step to avoiding distraction is being able to prioritize tasks. List out everything that requires your attention and ask yourself if each task on the list fits with your research goal. If you can only tackle so many issues in a day, you need to take care of the most important tasks first.

Be Realistic About Your Commitments

Rotello tells his students not to over-commit themselves to tasks they don’t have the time to accomplish. “I often see people take on more tasks than they can handle, in which case sometimes even a good idea can end up becoming a burden and yield no results,” Rotello says.

Developing a process for deciding which tasks to take on can require a little bit of trial and error. Rotello stresses the importance of looking critically at your own work and being honest about what you’re able to accomplish. After all, if you’re not getting all your most important work done, you might be affecting others’ productivity as well.

“If you keep finding yourself being the rate limiting step,” he says, “change the pathway.”

Own Your Work

Rotello urges young researchers to take ownership of their projects. Researchers should be like homeowners and not renters, he says. An owner of a house is proactive and tries to plan ahead to keep the house in shape within a reasonable budget; whereas a renter is passive and waits for others to fix problems, he says. Similarly, a good researcher should be proactive in their planning and willing to tackle problems as they happen.

“It is critical for scientists to see a research project as a whole,” Rotello advises, “and to carefully plan each piece that needs to be done.” Taking the control experiment in a research project as an example, Rotello says a good researcher would spend their time meticulously designing the experiment to ensure it produces useful data from which the team can learn.

Expect the Unexpected

But a researcher must also learn how to set a realistic timeline for his or her project.

“Things always come up,” Rotello says, “even though your calendar looks empty now, it may be full with unexpected tasks very soon.” It’s a good idea to leave extra time for each task, in case you run into complications.

Accept Setbacks Graciously

Students need to prepare for the possibility of failure and be ready to approach it in a productive way, according to Schatz.

“Failure is inherent in the nature of scientific research, so it does happen;” Schatz says, “therefore, it is important to talk about things with colleagues and with one’s adviser when this happens, and ultimately to come up with a way to decide when the time has come to quit and move to other projects.”

Know When to Move On

Both editors stressed the importance of knowing when to cut your losses and find a new project.

“Some students get emotionally attached to a project and don’t know when to quit,” Schatz says. He suggests giving a project a reasonable deadline for generating results and then moving on if the project doesn’t measure up.

If you have to quit a project, try not to become discouraged. Rotello points out that we can all learn something valuable from our failures and eventually build on that knowledge to find success.

Learn about services and resources for authors from ACS Publications.

Increase the Discoverability of Your Research with ORCID

Of the more than 6 million authors registered in major journal citations, it is estimated that roughly two-thirds of authors have the same first initial and last name as another, according to the Australian National Data Service. Think about Jack Smith and Jill Smith. Sometimes Jack’s name appears as “Jack Smith”; sometimes Jill’s name appears as “Jill Smith”… but sometimes they each appear as “J Smith,” respectively. As you can probably guess, this inconsistency in identification makes it a true challenge to follow the work of a particular researcher. That’s where ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) comes in.

The Publications Division of the American Chemical Society and the Royal Society of Chemistry today each signed the ORCID Open Letter. This signifies their intent to collect ORCID IDs for all submitting authors through use of the ORCID API, and to display such identifiers in the articles published in their respective society journals.

ORCID is an open registry that assigns an unique identifier to each and every researcher. While it’s been on the scene since 2012, it has rapidly gained popularity in recent years, and is on its way to becoming an industry standard. For the reader, the goal is to make it easier to find an author; for the author, the goal is to ensure you receive the credit and recognition your scholarly achievements deserve.

Currently, ACS prompts users to connect their ORCID ID with their ACS ID registration; authors are also able to connect it with our submission system, Paragon Plus. Automatic linkage between users and their professional activities is hugely important, which is why ACS Publications will continue to integrate multiple workflows with ORCID. In fact, ACS Publications now requires that all submitting authors enter their ORCID ID upon manuscript revision. Through coordination with CrossRef®, an author’s ACS publishing activity will automatically link to his/her ORCID profile. These integrations will improve accuracy, efficiency and visibility of the work done by researchers, funding organizations, and publishers.

Let’s say you authored a recent paper in ACS Nano. A fellow researcher reads your paper and wants to know more about you. If your ORCID ID is linked with your ACS Paragon Plus account, the reader will be able to view your ORCID profile to explore a fuller body of your work. This could, in turn, possibly lead to collaboration on future research. Besides identifying potential collaborators, ORCID IDs also provide valuable assessment opportunities for funders and institutions. By searching these comprehensive profiles, they can identify high-performing researchers and award grant funding accordingly.

Of course, you don’t have to share your full profile if you don’t want to. ORCID makes it easy for researchers to control their identifier, allowing them to choose what and how much of their information and work is accessible. It can also help researchers save time on administrative and reporting requirements because it works with so many different systems. Entering the same data repeatedly when applying for a grant will be a thing of the past.

So what are you waiting for? If you already have an ORCID ID, you are already reaping the benefits of linking it with your ACS publications activity. And if you don’t have one yet, there’s no need to worry. You can easily register for your (free) identifier today.

Learn more about ACS resources and services for researchers and authors.

ACS Editors Shine on 2016 Highly Cited Researchers List

A total of 54 editors of ACS Publications journals appeared on the 2016 Highly Cited Researchers list from Thomson Reuters. The Highly Cited Researchers list is determined by looking at highly-cited papers published between 2004-2014 in science and social sciences journals indexed in the Web of Science Core Collection. Thomson Reuters defines “highly-cited paper” as research that ranked in the top 1% for citations in the Web of Science in its field and publication year.

Join us in congratulating all the researchers who made the Highly Cited Researchers list this year, including our ACS Publications editors, who are grouped below by publication. Click on each editor’s name to learn more about their research and on their journal to learn more about leading research in their field.

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Jinwoo Cheon, Senior Editor, Accounts of Chemical Research
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Chunhai Fan, Associate Editor, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
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Omar K Farha, Associate Editor, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
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Yu-Guo Guo, Associate Editor, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
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David L Kaplan, Editor-in-Chief ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering
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Sukbok Chang, Associate Editor, ACS Catalysis
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Christopher J Chang, Senior Editor, ACS Central Science
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Dongyuan Zhao, Senior Editor, ACS Central Science
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Craig W Lindsley, Editor-in-Chief, ACS Chemical Neuroscience
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Prashant V Kamat, Editor-in-Chief, ACS Energy Letters
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Yang-Kook Sun, Associate Editor, ACS Energy Letters
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Manish Chhowalla, Associate Editor, ACS Nano
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Yury Gogotsi, Associate Editor, ACS Nano
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Paula T Hammond, Associate Editor, ACS Nano
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Ali Khademhosseini, Associate Editor, ACS Nano
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Shuit-Tong Lee, Associate Editor, ACS Nano
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Peter Nordlander, Associate Editor, ACS Nano
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Luis M Liz-Marzan, Co-Editor, ACS Omega
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Harry A Atwater, Editor-in-Chief, ACS Photonics
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Edward H Sargent, Associate Editor, ACS Photonics
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Ferdi Schueth, Associate Editor, Chemistry of Materials
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Michael J Zaworotko, Associate Editor, Crystal Growth & Design
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Pedro JJ Alvarez, Associate Editor, Environmental Science & Technology
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Bruce E Logan, Deputy Editor, Environmental Science & Technology Letters
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Jim Yang Lee, Associate Editor, Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research
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Frank Neese, Associate Editor, Inorganic Chemistry
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Chun-Hua Yan, Associate Editor, Inorganic Chemistry
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Hong-Cai Zhou, Associate Editor, Inorganic Chemistry
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Chi-Tang Ho, Associate Editor, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
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Francisco A Tomas-Barberan, Associate Editor, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
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Phil S Baran, Associate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society
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Benjamin F Cravatt, Associate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society
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Jean MJ Frechet, Associate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society
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Taeghwan Hyeon, Associate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society
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Chad A Mirkin, Associate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society
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Klaus Muellen, Associate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society
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Melanie S Sanford, Associate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society
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Donald G Truhlar, Associate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society
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Li-Jun Wan, Associate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society
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Omar M Yaghi, Associate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society
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Peidong Yang, Associate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society
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Gustavo E Scuseria, Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation
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Xi Zhang, Senior Editor, Langmuir
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Thomas P Russell, Associate Editor, Macromolecules
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A Paul Alivisatos, Co-Editor, Nano Letters
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Charles M Lieber, Co-Editor, Nano Letters
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Yi Cui, Associate Editor, Nano Letters
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Naomi J Halas, Associate Editor, Nano Letters
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Philip Kim, Associate Editor, Nano Letters
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Younan Xia, Associate Editor, Nano Letters
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Carsten Bolm, Associate Editor, The Journal of Organic Chemistry
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Catherine J Murphy, Deputy Editor, The Journal of Physical Chemistry C
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George C Schatz, Editor-in-Chief, The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
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Juan Bisquert, Senior Editor, The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
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Read the full list of Highly Cited Researchers.

Tricking the Brain Into Perceiving Tastier Healthy Foods

Scientists at the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique in France may be closing in on a way to let consumers savor the sweet taste of cake, cookies and other culinary delights without the sugar rush. In preliminary tests using a new device that allows them to screen for odor compounds in real foods, they have isolated several natural aromatic molecules that could be used to trick our brains into believing that desserts and other foods contain more fat, sugar or salt than they actually do.

Watch Thierry Thomas Danguin explain his research in this video:

Get more great videos from ACS.

2017 APS Polymer Physics Prize Goes to ACS Central Science’s Monica Olvera de la Cruz

ACS Central Science Senior Editor Monica Olvera de la Cruz is the recipient of the 2017 Polymer Physics Prize from the American Physical Society. The award recognizes Olvera de la Cruz’s “outstanding contributions to the theoretical understanding of polymers and the effects of electrostatic interactions on their structure and properties.” She is the Lawyer Taylor Professor of Materials Science and Engineering in Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering.

ACS Axial reached out to Olvera de la Cruz to learn more about her research, her involvement with ACS Central Science, and her advice to the next generation of scientists.

How would you describe your work?

I am a physical chemist working in soft materials using statistical mechanics, electrostatics, elasticity, thermodynamics and kinetic theory.

What are some potential practical applications of your research?

Our studies aim to design materials that respond to external stimuli including responsive gels and polymer membranes for water filtration and energy storage and conversion devices.

What sparked your initial interest in polymers?

The multiple conformations they take, which are accessed by changing external parameters, and their relevance to biology and biotechnology.

How do you see your work influencing other areas of chemistry?

My work can help the design of polymers to act as sensors, filtration devices, or delivery of therapeutic materials by specifying backbone configurations and molecular weights for the desired application.

Prior to 2015, the APS Polymer Physics Prize prize had never been awarded to a woman. Now it’s gone to two in a row. Do you feel like the work of women is being taken more seriously than it was when you started out?

I think the work of women in polymer physics has been so significant that it cannot be ignored

Can you talk about the role of reviewers in a journal like ACS Central Science? What are the ideal skills of a reviewer? 

The reviewers should evaluate the quality of the work, its significance, and its accessibility to the broad background of the ACS Central Science readers. A skillful reviewer can evaluate and express the value of the work reviewed.

What’s the most common piece of advice you give to younger scientists working in your group?

Find problems that are puzzling and that others have not formulated.

What are some of your hopes for ACS Central Science in 2017?

To publish solid work in exciting research areas that guide many more studies by the community.

Learn more about Monica Olvera de la Cruz and her research.

Watch How an Insulin Pill Could Transform Diabetes Treatment

Every day, millions of Americans with diabetes have to inject themselves with insulin to manage their blood-sugar levels. But less painful alternatives are emerging. Scientists are developing a new way of administering the medicine orally with tiny vesicles that can deliver insulin where it needs to go without a shot. Now they are sharing their in vivo testing results.

Watch as Mary McCourt, Lawrence M. Mielnicki, and Jamie Catalano discuss their work:

Watch more great videos from ACS.

ACS Editors’ Choice: Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment — And More!

This week: Alzheimer’s Disease treatment, investigating heat transfer in nanofluids, narrow spectrum antibiotics — and more!

Each and every day, ACS grants free access to a new peer-reviewed research article from one of the Society’s journals. These articles are specially chosen by a team of scientific editors of ACS journals from around the world to highlight the transformative power of chemistry. Access to these articles will remain open to all as a public service.

Check out this week’s picks!
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Discovery of the 3-Imino-1,2,4-thiadiazinane 1,1-Dioxide Derivative Verubecestat (MK-8931)–A β-Site Amyloid Precursor Protein Cleaving Enzyme 1 Inhibitor for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease
jm-2016-00307s_0010
J. Med. Chem., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.6b00307
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Graphene Encapsulated Copper Microwires as Highly MRI Compatible Neural Electrodes
nl-2016-03829k_0007
Nano Lett., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b03829
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New Measurements of the Apparent Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluids and Investigation of Their Heat Transfer Capabilities
je-2016-00767q_0024
J. Chem. Eng. Data, Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.jced.6b00767
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Sulfoglucosides as Novel Modified Forms of the Mycotoxins Alternariol and Alternariol Monomethyl Ether
jf-2016-03120w_0009
J. Agric. Food Chem., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.6b03120
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Access to Cyclopropyl-Fused Azacycles via a Palladium-Catalyzed Direct Alkenylation Strategy
ol-2016-029829_0009
Org. Lett., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.orglett.6b02982
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Supramolecular Conjugated Polymer Materials for in Situ Pathogen Detection
am-2016-09807c_0006
ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acsami.6b09807
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1,2,4-Triazolidine-3-thiones as Narrow Spectrum Antibiotics against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii
ml-2016-002962_0005
ACS Med. Chem. Lett., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acsmedchemlett.6b00296
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Choosing an Important Project: The First Stage to Getting Research Published

The following editorial originally appeared in Analytical Chemistry.

This is the season that faculty spend a lot of time discussing research projects with potential graduate students. Like many analytical chemistry faculty, I am affiliated with several graduate departments and training programs, each of which have multiple dates to meet with visiting students. Thus, I find myself involved in graduate recruiting for what appears to be an ever increasing number of weeks each year.

In discussing research project ideas with potential graduate students, they have asked how I, as a principal investigator, develop my research ideas. I find that some students do not realize the time, energy, and thought that go into the design of a good graduate student research project.

On a related note, I have had several authors complain about getting papers rejected even though the rejected paper represented the major output of one of their graduate student’s careers, and they cannot fathom how the reviewers or editor called their student’s work “incremental” and not important. As research directors, we want to make sure all of our student’s projects are significant and important.

Said differently, the ideas that I present to potential students are as good as I can make them. Let us not worry about how we initially arrive at research ideas, but instead, let us think about how they are developed into an available graduate student research project. After creating an idea, I spend several months thinking about it, modifying it and considering it from every possible angle. This is the process of creating a grant proposal to fund the student. After writing down many details and placing it into the context of everyone else’s research in the field, I then submit it to a group of colleagues whose job it is to evaluate my ideas. These unknown colleagues are so critical that only a small fraction of my ideas receive the funding stamp of approval. If the idea is not good enough (and many are not), I rewrite and resubmit, and yet again if need be. While I am not sure about your ideas, only a fraction of my ideas make it through this process.

Now that I have a funded project, I can drop it onto the unsuspecting graduate student as if it was an idea from last week, and not the result of more than a year of hard work. While securing funding is a long and painful process, it helps ensure our students work on important research.

Even if you have an easier source of funding than a competitive external grant, I would go further and state that graduate research efforts should matter as each student requires considerable effort in terms of financial resources and time. Taking into account the 5.5 years of teaching assistant/research assistant/fellowship support for the average Ph.D. student, including salary, benefits, tuition, and indirect costs, and then adding supplies, equipment, and instrument time, a graduate student in the U.S.A. oftentimes costs the government and university more than a quarter million dollars. A project costing this much should matter.

From the graduate student perspective, they have just over 60 months of time to allocate to their graduate career; they need to use this limited resource wisely. For example, while learning every analytical approach used in a large group may sound useful, it likely will detract from their ability to advance a few significant research areas. Graduate student time is valuable, and the research director should encourage the student to spend their time on important training opportunities and on significant research projects. While graduate research efforts may result in a combination of both substantial and incremental publications, or may include publication of preliminary results, the important overarching goal(s) of their efforts should be clear.

Of course, projects that involve important research areas that are well planned and executed by promising graduate students will result in exciting science and thus will be published in the best journals, including Analytical Chemistry.

Discover more great editorials from Analytical Chemistry.

Welcome the Newest Associate Editors of ACS Publications Journals – Q3 2016

New associate editors bring more than just changes to a publication’s masthead. They bring new experiences, new perspectives and new ideas to their publications. Get to know some of ACS’ latest associate editors and learn what unique gifts they’ll be bringing to their respective journals.

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Thomas Riedl, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces

title

What do you hope to bring to your journal?
I will do my best to be a fair, competent and approachable representative of the journal.

image description

image description

Describe your current research.
My current research interests include the physics and technology of (opto-)electronic devices. Aside from the study of fundamental properties of organic/inorganic hybrid structures, my group aims to to bridge the gap between fundamental research and specific application oriented challenges.

What are the major challenges facing your field today?
It has become increasingly challenging to recruit qualified and highly motivated young researchers for our projects. Many of our interdisciplinary graduates prefer an attractive position in industry, at the same time some are just deterred by the seemingly limited perspectives of a career in academia.A further challenge relates to a number of exciting new developments in our field, e.g. in organic or perovskite based (opto-)electronics, which for various reasons seem to struggle taking the next step to enter real applications or even industrial products. With our research we do hope to foster this step.

Do you have a recent paper in an ACS journal that you’d like to highlight?

Stress Management in Thin-Film Gas-Permeation Barriers
ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2016, 8 (6), pp 4056–4061
DOI: 10.1021/acsami.5b11499

Polyanionic, Alkylthiosulfate-Based Thiol Precursors for Conjugated Polymer Self-Assembly onto Gold and Silver
ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2014, 6 (14), pp 11758–11765
DOI: 10.1021/am5025148</strong>

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Cristina Nevado, ACS Central Science

title
What do you hope to bring to your journal?

My passion and enthusiasm for chemistry as a central, enabling discipline capable of impacting many other areas of research.
38781405_cristina_nevado_dsc00940
Describe your current research.

Our group, rooted in organic chemistry, focuses on a multidisciplinary research program supported on three pillars:

  • First, the development of new catalytic processes for the construction of C-C and C-X bonds together with fundamental mechanistic understanding of these transformations to foster novel reaction designs.
  • Second, the implementation of such methods to streamline the synthesis of complex natural products to interrogate complex biological systems connected to cell motility.
  • A third focus is the study at a molecular level, both computational and experimentally, of protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions relevant to cancer progression and metastasis.

What are the major challenges facing your field today?
Challenges of my field are those of chemistry as a whole, i.e. to identify the most relevant problems that our world faces today and how chemistry, as a central science, can contribute to impact them in a positive manner.

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Ulrike Eggert, Biochemistry

title
What do you hope to bring to your journal?

Biochemistry is in the process of expanding its scope to include research in biological chemistry in the broadest sense. I am excited to bring my expertise in chemical biology and cell biology – areas that have traditionally been associated less with Biochemistry.

Women Professors of KCL photoshoot, May 2016 at the Strand Campus, London on the 01/01/2014. Photo: David Tett

Describe your current research.

My group studies how cells regulate and execute cytokinesis, the final step of cell division. Cytokinesis requires the coordinated action of the cytoskeleton, the cell cycle, and membrane machineries. We use chemical biology and cell biology approaches to study cytokinesis at the process, pathway, protein and metabolite levels.

What are the major challenges facing your field today?
Chemists and biologists think quite differently and often speak different languages. For interdisciplinary research to be successful, it is key to find ways to bridge disciplinary thinking so that the most important questions can be addressed with the best experimental strategies.

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Jeffrey Elam, Chemistry of Materials

title
What do you hope to bring to your journal?

I bring knowledge of thin films and surface chemistry. In particular atomic layer deposition.

Dr. Jeffrey W. Elam Principal Chemist, Group Leader Energy Systems Division Argonne National Laboratory. 30337D

Describe your current research.

My research aims to advance the science and technology of atomic layer processing. On the fundamental side, we explore the surface chemistry of ALD in great detail to gain insight into why some ALD processes succeed while others fail. On the applied side, we are performing the science and engineering required to put ALD films to practical use in areas such as batteries and solar power.

What are the major challenges facing your field today?

Selective deposition is a key challenge facing the atomic layer deposition community – the ability to grow materials with atomic level precision on select areas of a surface while leaving the rest of the surface untouched. This capability would enable highly selective catalysts, high performance A diverse range of strategies are under investigation but all of them rely on the judicious selection of chemicals and conditions to favor a particular surface chemical reaction.
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Julien Nicolas, Chemistry of Materials

title
What do you hope to bring to your journal?

I hope I could bring my expertise in macromolecular synthesis and drug delivery to promote cutting edge research related to soft materials and to make sure that Chemistry of Materials remains one of the very best journals in the field.
38781405_julien_nicolas
Describe your current research.

My coworkers and I work on advanced macromolecular synthesis and the design of innovative polymer-based nanomedicines and biomaterials. In particular, beyond fundamental aspects of macromolecular synthesis, we are focused on polymer prodrug nanoparticles, degradable vinyl materials and new approaches to perform efficient drug delivery.

What are the major challenges facing your field today?

One of the main challenges in the field of drug delivery is to efficiently and safely delivery drugs to specific areas in the body by using innocuous drug delivery systems. There is still a lot to do to meet these requirements.

Do you have a recent paper in an ACS journal that you’d like to highlight?

Simple Synthesis of Cladribine-Based Anticancer Polymer Prodrug Nanoparticles with Tuneable Drug Delivery Properties
Chem. Mater. 2016, 28, 2268
DOI: 10.1021/acs.chemmater.6b02502

Degradable and Comb-Like PEG-Based Copolymers by Nitroxide-Mediated Radical Ring-Opening Polymerization
Biomacromolecules, 2013, 14 (10), pp 3769–3779
DOI: 10.1021/bm401157g
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M. Rosa Palacin, Chemistry of Materials

title
What do you hope to bring to your journal?

Enthusiasm and experience in battery research. I’m glad to be part of the team and to be able to contribute to promote materials chemistry.
38781405_rosapalacin
Describe your current research.

I’m involved in battery materials research, mostly targeting non-lithium based technologies. Focus is both on developing new electrodes and on improving performance through electrolyte optimization.
What are the major challenges facing your field today? The quest for low cost sustainable and affordable energy storage devices for crucial applications involving not only electronics but also transportation and electric grid. I feel fortunate to live this era in which materials development has such an impact in applications.

Do you have a recent paper in an ACS journal that you’d like to highlight?

Recent Achievements on Inorganic Electrode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries
J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2015, 137 (9), pp 3140–3156
DOI: 10.1021/ja507828x
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Thomas Hofstetter, Environmental Science & Technology

title
What do you hope to bring to your journal?

My enthusiasm for excellent and insightful papers in environmental chemistry! I hope to support ES&T in finding and publishing the best manuscripts that deal with transformations of organic pollutants.
38781405_hofstetter
Describe your current research.

In my research group, we are active in two different fields. First, we work on stable isotope based tools, with which we study the mechanisms of enzymatic and abiotic degradation of organic pollutants in soil and water. Based on the understanding of isotope effects of (bio)chemical reactions, we can use the changes of stable isotope ratios in the organic pollutant as proxies for reactive processes. The second field deals with the biogeochemistry of iron in oxides and phyllosilicates, and how to quantify their redox properties. We want to understand how redox reactions of iron affect the availability, mobility, persistence, and toxicity of pollutants in the subsurface.

What are the major challenges facing your field today?

We have several opportunities to contribute to environmental sciences and environmental technologies. In principle, environmental chemists should provide precise scientific information on the current and future dynamics of pollutants in the environment and in engineered systems, account for a large and increasing number of chemicals, and contribute to solving the most pressing problems. It is a challenge to do the “right thing”.

Do you have a recent paper in an ACS journal that you’d like to highlight?

Substrate and Enzyme Specificity of the Kinetic Isotope Effects Associated with the Dioxygenation of Nitroaromatic Contaminants
Environ. Sci. Technol., 2016, 50 (13), pp 6708–6716
DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.5b05084

Thermodynamic Characterization of Iron Oxide–Aqueous Fe2+ Redox Couples
Environ. Sci. Technol., 2016, 50 (16), pp 8538–8547
DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b02661

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Daniel Schlenk, Environmental Science & Technology

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What do you hope to bring to your journal?

I hope to bring my expertise in mechanistic toxicology to better link molecular effects which can be used in high throughput scenarios with apical whole animal and population endpoints to predict adverse outcomes and reduce uncertainty in risk assessments.
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Describe your current research.

My laboratory explores mechanistic linkages between molecular effects of legacy and emerging environmental contaminants with whole animal endpoints of reproduction and development.

What are the major challenges facing your field today?

I think one of the major challenges in Environmental Toxicology is predicting risk to humans and wildlife based on (1) laboratory tests which are often of short duration and high dose, or (2) monitoring data which demonstrate molecular changes without linkage to population.

Do you have a recent paper in an ACS journal that you’d like to highlight?

Time- and Oil-Dependent Transcriptomic and Physiological Responses to Deepwater Horizon Oil in Mahi-Mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) Embryos and Larvae
Environ. Sci. Technol., 2016, 50 (14), pp 7842–7851
DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b02205

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Bernard Binks, Langmuir

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What do you hope to bring to your journal?
I hope that I can bring expertise in wet surface chemistry, to include emulsions, foams, surfactant phase behavior and the behavior of solid particles at fluid interfaces. I aim to be part of the team yearning to improve the quality of the papers submitted to the journal and hence raising its impact factor.
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Describe your current research.
My current research centers around the properties of colloidal particles adsorbed to a variety of fluid interfaces, including air-water, oil-water, oil-oil and oil-air. Dispersed systems including such interfaces are particle-stabilized emulsions and foams (aqueous and non-aqueous) and novel materials like powdered emulsions and dry oil. The effects of particle type, particle shape and interactions between interfacial particles are all being studied.

What are the major challenges facing your field today?
A major challenge is to measure unequivocally the contact angle particles make with a particular fluid interface, particularly for very small particles (say < 50 nm). Little work on the simulation of interfacial particles has taken place to date. It would be nice to see industry engaging more with this relatively new field of interfacial science as many products and processes contain particles adsorbed to some extent at fluid interfaces.

Do you have a recent paper in an ACS journal that you’d like to highlight?

Evaporation of Particle-Stabilized Emulsion Sunscreen Films
ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2016, 8 (33), pp 21201–21213
DOI: 10.1021/acsami.6b06310
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Han Zuilhof, Langmuir

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What do you hope to bring to your journal?
A drive to outline the value of fundamental interface science – importance does not equal impact factor, and long-term relevance should drive science. I am focused on novel methodology and deepening understanding, not just the application of the ‘almost known’, and I hope to steer Langmuir towards that goal!
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Describe your current research.

(bio)-Organic Surface Chemistry: sticking molecules fast, mild and efficiently in an ordered manner to whatever surface is relevant, ranging from inorganic Crystals via plastics to cell walls.

What are the major challenges facing your field today?

Two things coming together: One the one hand, a greater needed for increased definition of surfaces: with the ongoing miniaturization surface defects become more and more important. We should thus further improve surface functionalization to get them defect-free. On the other hand, we need more sensitive and structurally more informative surface analysis tools: the fact that we can make great cartoons of modified surfaces does not tell us how the surfaces really look like.

Anything else you’d like readers to know about you?

I run the Editorship from both Tianjin University (China) and Wageningen University (Netherlands) – working in two different research environments is stimulating to me, and hopefully also to those environments. Outside of science I love watching dark night skies with my telescope.

Do you have a recent paper in an ACS journal that you’d like to highlight?

Efficient and Tunable Three-Dimensional Functionalization of Fully Zwitterionic Antifouling Surface Coatings

Langmuir, 2016, 32 (40), pp 10199–10205
DOI: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.6b02622

To be able to functionalize antifouling brushes in a easy manner independent of the thickness of the brush is a big step forward in the field. It took us quite some time to make this step, but this is really cool!
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