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In the News with Nano Letters

Nano Letters is a forum for reporting original results on fundamental, applied, and emerging research in all areas of nanoscience and nanotechnology that require rapid dissemination. A chief criterion to fit within the scope of Nano Letters is the convergence of at least two different areas or disciplines.

In the 20 years since the journal began publishing, many of the articles have been deemed instantly worthy of press coverage due to the impact of the reported results. Here, we have curated a list of articles published this year that have been featured and covered by various media outlets.

An Anode-Free Zn–MnO2 Battery
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 3, 1446–1453
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.0c04519

In the News: Science Bulletin

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Ultra-absorptive Nanofiber Swabs for Improved Collection and Test Sensitivity of SARS-CoV-2 and other Biological Specimens
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 3, 1508–1516
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.0c04956

In the News: The Korea Herald

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In Situ Transforming RNA Nanovaccines from Polyethylenimine Functionalized Graphene Oxide Hydrogel for Durable Cancer Immunotherapy
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 5, 2224–2231
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.0c05039

In the News: Healthline

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Magnesium-Based Micromotors as Hydrogen Generators for Precise Rheumatoid Arthritis Therapy
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 5, 1982–1991
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.0c04438
In the News: Healthline Innovations

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Printing Porous Carbon Aerogels for Low Temperature Supercapacitors
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 9, 3731–3737
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.0c04780

In the News: Physics World

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Swimmers Heal on the Move Following Catastrophic Damage
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 5, 2240–2247
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.0c05061

In the News: Engadget

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Efficient and Robust Metallic Nanowire Foams for Deep Submicrometer Particulate Filtration
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 7, 2968–2974
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c00050

In the News: Science Magazine

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Outdoor Personal Thermal Management with Simultaneous Electricity Generation
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 9, 3879–3886
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c00400

In the News: Gizmodo

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Oxygen-Generating Cyanobacteria Powered by Upconversion-Nanoparticles-Converted Near-Infrared Light for Ischemic Stroke Treatment
Nano Lett. 2021, XXXX, XXX, XXX-XXX
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c00719

In the News: Novus Light

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Washable, Sewable, All-Carbon Electrodes and Signal Wires for Electronic Clothing
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 17, 7093–7099
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c01039

In the News: Daily Mail

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Crumpled MXene Electrodes for Ultrastretchable and High-Area-Capacitance Supercapacitors
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 18, 7561–7568
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c02071

In the News: New Atlas

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Flexible Lead-Free X-ray Detector from Metal–Organic Frameworks
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 16, 6983–6989
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c02336

In the News: Physics World

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Magnetic Testis Targeting and Magnetic Hyperthermia for Noninvasive, Controllable Male Contraception via Intravenous Administration
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 14, 6289–6297
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c02181

In the News: Forbes

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Electrochromic Inorganic Nanostructures with High Chromaticity and Superior Brightness
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 10, 4343–4350
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c00904

In the News: Optica

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Surveilling and Tracking COVID-19 Patients Using a Portable Quantum Dot Smartphone Device
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 12, 5209–5216
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c01280

In the News: World Economic Forum

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Graphene Electric Field Sensor Enables Single Shot Label-Free Imaging of Bioelectric Potentials
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 12, 4944–4949
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c00543

In the News: Wired

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High Osmotic Power Generation via Nanopore Arrays in Hybrid Hexagonal Boron Nitride/Silicon Nitride Membranes
Nano Lett. 2021, 21, 10, 4152–4159
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.0c04704

In the News: Futurity

Mastering Scholarly Communication – Part 7: Standards of Scientific Writing

The ACS Style Guide has always been a classic handbook for scientific publication. But in 2020, it was revised and expanded as the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication. The ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication not only provides students, researchers, educators, and librarians with professional guidance, it also helps researchers at different stages of their careers to respond to the evolving world of publishing.

This ACS Axial series contains excerpts from the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication. Parts of the original text be available for free for a limited time under an ACS Free to Read License. Specific sections will be indicated at the end of each post. 

The words chosen by a writer are one of the defining characteristics of that author’s style; however, word choice is not governed by style alone. The audience for an article must influence a writer’s choice of words so that the writer can select words that are likely to be known to the audience and define the words that are not. The type of document also may influence a writer’s word choices because some documents, such as journal articles and books, tend to require more formal word usage, whereas other documents, such as emails, allow less formality.

Common Confusing Words and Phrases

The choice of the correct word to express meaning begins with a good dictionary, but it also extends to understanding small differences in meaning between two words or phrases that are almost synonymous or that are spelled similarly but have significant differences in meaning. It is best to use words in their primary meanings and to avoid using a word to express a thought if such usage is uncommon, informal, or primarily literary. Many words are clear when you are speaking because you can amplify your meaning with gestures, expressions, and vocal inflections, but when these same words are written, they may be clear only to you.

Words: Assure vs. Ensure vs. Insure

Usage: To assure is to affirm; to ensure is to make certain; to insure is to indemnify for money.

Example sentences:

He assured me that the work had been completed.

The procedure ensures that clear guidelines have been established.

You cannot get a mortgage unless you insure your home.

Phrases: Based on vs. On the basis of

Usage:  Phrases starting with “based on” must modify a noun or pronoun that usually immediately precedes or follows the phrase. Use phrases starting with “on the basis of” to modify a verb.

Example sentences:

The doctors’ new methods in brain surgery were based on Ben Carson’s work.

On the basis of the molecular orbital calculations, we propose a mechanism that can account for all the major features of alkali- and alkaline-earth-catalyzed gasification reactions. (not ‘based on’)

Words: Comprise vs. Compose

Usage: Use “to comprise” to mean “to contain” or “to consist of”; it is not a synonym for “to compose.” The whole comprises the parts, or the whole is composed of the parts, but the whole is not “comprised of” the parts. Never use “is comprised of.”

Example sentences:

INCORRECT: A book is comprised of chapters.

CORRECT: A book comprises chapters.

CORRECT: A book is composed of chapters.

Using Gender-Neutral Languages

Most publishers have gone to great effort to eliminate the use of gender-biased language from their publications. Gender-neutral language is also now expected in scientific publishing. Current style guides and writing guides urge copy editors and writers to choose terms that do not reinforce outdated sex and gender roles.

Gender-neutral language can be accurate and unbiased and not necessarily awkward. The most problematic words are the noun “man,” when used to refer to humans generally, and the pronouns “he” and “his,” when used to refer to a nonspecific individual. These terms are no longer considered gender-neutral, but there are usually several satisfactory gender-neutral alternatives for these words. Choose an alternative carefully and keep it consistent with the context. Of course, if the identity of the person being discussed is known, then it is perfectly acceptable to use their specified pronouns.

How to Use a Comparative Phrase

Words: Fewer vs. Less

Usage: Use “fewer” to refer to number; use “less” to refer to quantity. However, use “less” with number and unit of measure combinations because they are regarded as singular.

Examples:

Fewer than 50 animals

Fewer than 100 samples

Less product

Less time

Less work

Less than 5 mg

Less than 3 days

Phrases: Greater than vs. More than vs. Over vs. In excess of

Usage: Use the more accurate terms “greater than” or “more than” rather than the imprecise “over” or “in excess of.”

Example sentences:

Greater than 50% (not in excess of 50%)

More than 100 samples (not over 100 samples)

More than 25 mg (not in excess of 25 mg, not over 25 mg)

Phrases: On (the) one hand and On the other hand

Usage: Use “on (the) one hand” and “on the other hand” to present conflicting points of view. These two phrases should be used only as a pair, never alone, and preferably within a few sentences of each other. In other words, use “on the other hand” only if “on (the) one hand” precedes it.

Example sentences:

On (the) one hand, we wanted to arrive early so that we could practice our presentation and correct any last-minute problems. On the other hand, we did not want to miss the current session of talks and the opportunity to talk to others about their research.

Avoid Using Inappropriate Words and Expressions

Write in a style that conveys the intended meaning using simple, subject-appropriate language. Avoid slang and jargon, which are expressions in the common vernacular that are not formal enough to be appropriate in a professional context. Write as if speaking to a colleague. For instance, instead of writing, “We put the sample in the fridge for a while,” write, “We stored the sample in the refrigerator at 4 ºC overnight.”

Do not use “respectively” when you mean “separately” or “independently.”

INCORRECT: The electrochemical oxidations of chromium and tungsten tricarbonyl complexes, respectively, were studied.

CORRECT: The electrochemical oxidations of chromium and tungsten tricarbonyl complexes were studied separately.

Avoid using contractions and abbreviations:

INCORRECT:  Wasn’t

CORRECT: Was not

INCORRECT: In the lab

CORRECT: In the laboratory

Avoid using such redundant sentence structures as “it is,” “there are,” and “this is”:

INCORRECT: It is a procedure that is often used.

CORRECT: This procedure is often used.

INCORRECT: There are seven steps that must be completed.

CORRECT:  Seven steps must be completed.

INCORRECT: This is a problem that is prevalent in the sciences.

CORRECT: This problem is prevalent in the sciences.

For more information on using making better word choices, please refer to section 5.1.1 of the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication.

Discover the All-New ACS Solutions Center for Organizations

ACS Publications is very excited to announce the launch of the ACS Solutions Center, an online resource focused specifically on the various organizations that we serve. This new center, which replaces and improves upon content and tools that were previously available within ACS InfoCentral, provides insight into ACS Publications’ research areas, products, services, and access information for organizations. With this new resource, our goal is to deliver a dynamic digital experience that helps institutional purchase decision makers easily browse and self-educate about ACS Publications’ solutions based on their areas of interest and/or professional role. ACS Publications invites you to be a part of the next big discovery with access to the highest quality content and resources in the chemical sciences!

Find Content That Matches Your Interests

Whether your focus is agriculture or pharmaceuticals, ACS Publications has content to keep you up to date on the latest research, help you educate, or inspire your next idea. See how our journals, e-books, and educational content can provide new insight in these areas of research.

Trusted Knowledge Solutions for Your Community

From university libraries to corporate knowledge banks, ACS Publications provides high-quality, trusted resources for students, educators, researchers, and librarians. Our goal is to be the preferred publishing partner of academic, corporate, government and nonprofit organizations around the world. See what we have to offer.

Find the Right Content, Every Time

ACS Publications provides the most interesting, reliable, and relevant scientific content in the world. Empower your students, faculty, staff, or scientists with the information they need to spark their next influential paper, product, or discovery. Learn more about our available solutions and how they can help educate and inform learners and professionals throughout your organization.

ACS Makes Publication Access Easy

From providing the best scientific resources to students and faculty, to always up-to-date research libraries for corporate or government organizations, ACS has access options that meet your specific needs. Find out about all our access options.

Usage Insights and More

ACS is committed to demonstrating the value of our institutional solutions and providing meaningful insight into how our products and services are being used by your patrons. Customers can now visit an updated Manage My Account page to access our administrator portal, where you can use a variety of tools and resources to maximize the impact of your institutional subscriptions. We also have a dedicated page for resources related to pricing, MARC and KBART files, sample licenses, and more.

Connect with a Sales Representative

If you have any questions or concerns regarding your institution’s ACS Publications subscription, you can now easily identify and connect with your Regional Account Manager using this tool.

If you have any questions or comments about the ACS Solutions Center, please submit the contact form here and we will respond to your inquiry.

JACS Au Meet the Editors: Sabine L. Flitsch and Nuno Maulide

JACS Au is a global, open access, multidisciplinary journal and its diverse editorial team is an essential element of its strength. Editor-in-Chief Christopher W. Jones is supported by a team of six Associate Editors from around the world, each bringing a different research focus and skill set to the journal. But who are these editors? In this video series, JACS Au Associate Editors introduce themselves through candid conversation, speaking with their fellow editors as peers in a series of illuminating discussions.

Watch JACS Au Associate Editors Sabine L. Flitsch, of the University of Manchester, and Nuno Maulide, of the University of Vienna, sit down to discuss their life, work, and their advice for the next generation of chemists.


Learn More About JACS Au.


Why Not Join Us at JACS Au?

At JACS Au, we welcome manuscripts reporting significant research discoveries in all fields of chemistry and related sciences.

Find out more and submit your research to JACS Au.

Mastering Scholarly Communication – Part 6: Graphics and Tables

The ACS Style Guide has always been a classic handbook for scientific publication. But in 2020, it was revised and expanded as the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication. The ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication not only provides students, researchers, educators, and librarians with professional guidance, it also helps researchers at different stages of their careers to respond to the evolving world of publishing.

This ACS Axial series contains excerpts from the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication. Parts of the original text be available for free for a limited time under an ACS Free to Read License. Specific sections will be indicated at the end of each post. 

Graphics

Graphics are an integral part of a manuscript that helps authors present a lot of information without the need for lengthy descriptive phrases. As modern instruments and computational tools generate enormous data, selecting the right plot to present data becomes a key step in highlighting new advances presented in the article.  Many people “read” a research article by scanning the figures. Each graphic, together with its caption, should be able to stand alone and include the essential information.

When to Use Graphics?

Use a graphic when a visual presentation:

  • Improves the effectiveness of the data presentation
  • Provides a better understanding of the results and/or increases the reader’s comprehension
  • Makes it easier to view trends and relationships in the data (relative proportions, magnitudes, etc.)
  • Highlights specific results with quantitative analysis
  • Communicates the information more succinctly than in prose

For more information on designing graphics, please refer to section 4.1.3 of the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication.

How to Use Published Graphics or Data?

Use original graphics in your article whenever possible. If you plan to include information from a previously published graphic, determine whether you can provide enough information by simply citing the previous publication or whether it is necessary to include a copy of the previous graphic. If you include the graphic, be sure it is a clear, high-quality image.

Clip art and images taken from the internet typically require copyright permission. If you are unable to obtain permission, the image cannot be included in the article. Obtain and provide written copyright permission, if required.

Whether you include either a copy or a slightly modified version of a previously published graphic, the reproduction or modification should be stated in the caption, and copyright permission obtained if required by the copyright holder. Copyright permission is typically not required when the graphic is redrawn, meaning there is extensive modification to the point where it can be considered a new graphic.

What is a Table of Contents Graphic/Graphical Abstract?

One of the most important but often neglected graphics in an article is the Table of Contents (TOC) graphic. It is published on the Table of Contents as well as next to the article’s Abstract in most journals. It is one of the first things a potential reader sees, and it can either attract a reader or cause them to skip over your article.

A Good TOC Graphic:

  • Tells the reader what the article is about
  • Is a simple unique color scheme or illustration
  • Is provided in the manuscript in its actual published size (refer to the Author Guidelines for specific journal requirements)
  • Fits into the size recommended by the journal (usually a horizontal frame)
  • Has minimal text, with all text legible when viewed at the published size.

In this video, ACS Editors share advice on getting started with a paper and creating figures.


For more information on TOC graphics, please refer to section 4.1.5 of the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication.

Tables

When to Use Tables?

Use tables when the data cannot be presented clearly as narrative, when many precise numbers must be presented, or when meaningful interrelationships can be better conveyed by a tabular format. Tables should supplement, not duplicate, text and figures.

Determine whether the material you want to present really warrants a table. A table should generally consist of at least three interrelated columns and three rows. If you have only two columns, try writing the material as a narrative. If your table has unusual alignment and positioning requirements, consider making it a figure instead. If you have three columns, but they do not relate to each other, consider whether the material is really a list of items and not a table at all.

For more information on using tables, please refer to section 4.2.1  of the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication.

Parts of a Table

Effective tables are well designed, so think carefully—first, about the data you need to present and, second, about the best way to present it visually on a page. Sometimes, what looks fine on a letter-size sheet of paper is not practical for an online journal or book.

Parts of a table. Source: adapted from Dopilka, A; Zhao, R.; Well,J. M.; Svilen, B.; Peng, X.; Chan, C. K. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces2018, 10 (44), 37981–37991. Copyright 2018 American Chemical Society.

Title

Give every table a brief, informative title that describes its contents in non-sentence format. The title should be complete enough to be understood without referring to the text.

Column heading

Every column must have a heading that describes the material below it. Be as succinct as possible. Keep column headings to no more than two lines if possible and use abbreviations and symbols whenever practical.

Spanner heading

If a column heading applies to more than one column, it should span the columns to which it applies. This is called a spanner heading (or sometimes a straddle heading). Below the spanner heading, give the specific heading for each column.

Footnote

Table footnotes include explanatory material referring to the whole table and to specific entries. Examples of information that should be placed in general footnotes referring to the whole table explanations of abbreviations and symbols used frequently throughout the table.

For more information on designing tables, please refer to section 4.2.4  of the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication.

Multimedia Files

Multimedia is an effective way for enhancing demonstration and communication of research findings and promoting communications. Before creating a video or Web-Enhanced Objects (WEO), please refer to the author’s guide of specific journals to learn about whether such files are allowed to be used in the journals.

Video Files

Videos are useful ways to provide demonstrations and simulations, to illustrate methods, or to discuss your research. Examples of acceptable file types include .qt, .mov, .avi, and .mpg.

ACS Web-Enhanced Objects (WEO)

The Web editions of ACS Journals allow authors to make use of multimedia attachments called Web-Enhanced Objects (WEOs) to further the understanding of the research being reported in their article. WEOs include graphics, text, 3D images, spectra, and videos. Links to WEOs appear in the HTML version of the published article.

For more information on using multimedia, please refer to section 4.1.6  of the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication.

ACS Malaysia Chapter Delivers Earth Day Talk: “Restore the Earth”

In celebration of Earth Day, ACS Malaysia Chapter and ACS Publications jointly organized a virtual talk on the topic “Restore the Earth” on April 22, 2021. The talk, held via Zoom, was attended not only by audiences based in Malaysia but people from all around the Asia Pacific region.

The talk was delivered by Professor Shane Snyder, Editor-in-Chief of ACS ES&T Water. He is also the Executive Director of the Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore.

The event was opened by the Chair of ACS Malaysia Chapter, Dr. Mohd Firdaus Abdul Wahab. During the talk, Professor Shane Snyder shared details about the water research at his institute and about ACS ES&T Water. The journal focuses on water quality, anthropogenic and geogenic contaminants, and environmental chemistry and technology for sustainable water management and reuse.

Professor Shane Snyder, presenting on the topic “Implementation of Best Available Technology in Underserved Communities: Challenges and Opportunities for Sustainability.”

“The Chapter is honored to have Professor Shane Snyder gracing our event again. His expertise and the activities carried out at NEWRI align well with many of the Chapter activities on water sustainability and environmental protection through chemistry. We hope to have more engagements with Professor Snyder and NEWRI in the future. Thanks to ACS Publications for co-organizing this program with us and making it a huge success.”

ACS Malaysia Chapter Chair, Dr Mohd Firdaus Abdul Wahab

At the end of the talk, ACS held a water quiz to engage the audiences with interesting facts about this important substance. Prizes were offered to the winners.

The Earth Day Quiz by ACS Publications

Next up, Professor Shane Snyder will be virtually heading to Institut Teknologi Bandung in Indonesia. The upcoming ACS virtual talk on “Water Research” will be held on June 24. Register now!

Read What Participants had to Say About the Event

“Excellent talk on works that have been done by NTU on water treatment. Nice work on ensuring safe water for all.”

-Dr. Nurul Huda Abd Karim, Treasurer, ACS Malaysia Chapter.

“It has been an absolutely amazing and enlightening talk on the special occasion of Earth day. I thoroughly enjoyed and was educated by Professor Shane Snyder about the implementation of the best available technology in underserved communities. It was very informative and valuable to realize the challenges and opportunities for sustainability. More importantly, the “Water Quiz” session was superbly structured. This talk encouraged me to participate in future ACS events/symposiums. Thank you, ACS Malaysia Chapter, for organizing such an excellent talk.”

-Dr. Asheesh Kumar, Scientist, CSIR-Indian Institute of Petroleum

“An interesting and informative talk on wastewater treatments around the world. It gave me insightful ideas to upscale water research from the lab to the community.”

-Dr. Krishna veni Veloo, Universiti Malaysia Kelantan

“My experience in attending the Earth Day talk has been extremely rewarding as Prof. Shane Snyder, the resource speaker, was very knowledgeable and yet very accommodating to the attendees. The knowledge I learned from the event about the most recent scientific breakthroughs to help solve environmental problems was worth the time and effort. I was inspired to do the same by helping our vulnerable societies have their own sources of clean water and energy through research and development. I am elated with this brief seminar, for I was given insights about the direction and strategies on how to start the advocacy with. I commend the American Chemical Society Malaysia Chapter for making this webinar possible even this time of the pandemic. I enjoyed it, especially the quiz part where all the participants were challenged to actively participate.”

-Rogelio O. Rantael Jr., Science Research Specialist II, DOST – Forest Products Research and Development Institute, Philippines

“This talk helped to increase awareness among students that everyone has to play their role to restore the Earth and change the world for the better.”

-Eka Latiffah Nadia, M.Phil. Student, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia

Special Issue Call for Papers: Advances in Genome Editing for Sustainable Agriculture

ACS Agricultural Science & Technology is preparing to publish a special issue highlighting advances in genome editing for sustainable agriculture. For readers, this special issue will be a source of high-quality papers in the field, and for authors, it will provide visibility for their excellent work in this area.

Significant advances in agricultural technologies will be needed to meet the future food demands of our planet. Growers are facing challenges from emerging plant diseases and pests along with herbicide and insecticide resistance. Crop yield increases will be needed despite the challenges of climate change and finite land and water resources. Meanwhile, consumers are demanding a greater variety and more nutritious foods with year-round availability.

Gene editing is a technology with the potential to bring about some of the rapid changes required to address these challenges. The great potential of CRISPR/Cas9-based precise gene-editing biotechnology is an emerging area of research being applied to plants and microorganisms. Many derivative technologies such as epigenome editing, transcriptional control, and genome-wide screening and editing are being developed. These innovative biotechnologies are powerful tools for dissecting functional genomics and show great potential in plant breeding and genetic improvements.

Along with the rapid advances in basic science and technological improvements, there are societal, economic, and regulatory hurdles to overcome before the value of this technology can be realized.

This special issue will broadly cover original research and review papers and opinion-style viewpoint articles in gene editing, including recent advances in gene editing and related technologies, application cases in agriculture, perspectives in agriculture application, and policies in different countries.

The editors are highly interested in the following topics, but not limited to:

  • Genome editing and its applications for sustainable agriculture and to address climate change.
  • Advances in genome editing tools: CRISPR/Cas9 and beyond, e.g., recently emerging protein editing tools
  • Plant transformation for efficient genome editing
  • Genome editing to address abiotic and biotic stresses and disease
  • Genome editing in increasing plant yield
  • Genome editing in improving food quality
  • Regulatory, Economic, Societal, and Policy considerations around genome editing applications in agriculture

Submission Instructions

Manuscripts must adhere to the guidelines available on the ACS Agricultural Science & Technology Information for Authors page and must be submitted electronically through the ACS Paragon Plus portal.

In Paragon Plus, specify a manuscript type, and activate the special issue feature to designate the paper for Advances in Genome Editing for Sustainable Agriculture. In addition, state in your cover letter that the paper is being submitted for the special issue.

All invited and contributed manuscripts will be screened for suitability upon submission and undergo the standard peer-review procedure of the journal. The final submission deadline for inclusion in the special issue is October 31, 2021.

Open Access

ACS journals offer diverse open-access publishing options. Please see ACSOpenScience.org for more information.

Editors

Xiangyuan Wan, University of Science and Technology Beijing, and Associate Editor, ACS Agricultural Science & Technology

Email: xwan@agscitech.acs.org

Laura McConnell, Bayer Crop Science, and Deputy Editor, ACS Agricultural Science & Technology
Email: lmcconnell@agscitech.acs.org

 

Mastering Scholarly Communication – Part 5: The Review Process

The ACS Style Guide has always been a classic handbook for scientific publication. But in 2020, it was revised and expanded as the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication. The ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication not only provides students, researchers, educators, and librarians with professional guidance, it also helps researchers at different stages of their careers to respond to the evolving world of publishing.

This ACS Axial series contains excerpts from theACS Guide to Scholarly Communication. Parts of the original text be available for free for a limited time under an ACS Free to Read License. Specific sections will be indicated at the end of each post. 

When a manuscript has been submitted to a journal and complies with all submission standards of the journal, the editor-in-chief will make the first review decision on whether to reject the manuscript or transfer it to an associate editor-in-chief, who is often chosen on the basis of his/her fields of expertise and sometimes other factors such as his/her workload. After accepting the transferred manuscript, the associate editor-in-chief shall decide whether to assign the manuscript to an external reviewer on the basis of his/her first review decision, and make a final decision on accepting or rejecting publication of the manuscript by going through the procedures including external reviewer reporting, etc.

When a manuscript is submitted to a journal and meets all the submission criteria, the journal’s editorial team must make an initial decision: to decline the submission or to assign it to an editor who will then move it through the necessary steps to a final decision, including accepting the manuscript for publication. Editors are generally assigned on the basis of subject expertise, but sometimes workload and availability play a role. The assigned editor then reviews the manuscript and either declines the submission, recommends the manuscript be transferred to another journal, or assigns the manuscript to be peer reviewed.

Learn More About the Peer Review Process

The peer review process.

Perhaps you’re already familiar with the peer review process, but many scholars still need to learn how to respond to review feedback, especially when a paper is rejected.

Review Feedback

After accepting an invitation to review a submission, a reviewer is allowed anywhere between several days to twoweeks, depending on the journal, to provide written comments, which can fall into twocategories: (1) comments that are only for the editor and (2) comments that are shared with the authors. The first type of feedback, comments for the editor only, should be restricted to expressing concerns about potential ethical violations. They should not include comments on the quality of the manuscript.

Reviewers evaluate submissions based on how well the authors answered their research questions, whether the conclusions and implications were appropriately derived from the results and findings, whether suitable techniques and methods were used, and whether the research advances the field. Perhaps an even more critical role of reviewers is to evaluate whether the arguments presented by the authors are sufficient and effective enough to inform and convince a typical reader of the value of the published work. Reviewers ensure the authors meet the standards of the discipline and the results and conclusions are warranted, and ultimately help maintain the integrity of the science.

For more information on the peer review process, please refer to section 2.5.2 of the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication.

Handling Rejection

Every scholar has to learn to deal with rejection in a professional and constructive manner. In the video, ACS editors share their tips for handling rejection and how to bounce back.
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How to Become an Excellent Reviewer

ACS Publications has created a free online training course to assist both new and experienced reviewers in mastering the core ideas of the review process. The ACS Reviewer Labwas designed by ACS editors, leading researchers, and ACS Publications staff. The six interactive modules provide practical guidance and real-life situations to help recognize ethical issues, to better understand the criteria for a review, and to formulate and write an effective evaluation. The six modules are as follows: (1) Introduction to Peer Review; (2) Ethics in Peer Review; (3) Preparing for Review; (4) Assessing Significance and Technical Quality; (5) Assessing Presentation and Readiness for Publication; and (6) Writing Your Review. The modules include exercises to test knowledge, videos, downloadable summary sheets, and a final assessment. The site requires a valid ACS ID, but registration and usage are free; the content is available in several languages.

ACS Reviewer Lab.

The Importance of Obtaining Peer Review Credit

Providing professional service to one’s research community is an important part of a researcher’s job description. When being considered for promotion or undergoing merit evaluations, individuals need to document their contributions to the scientific community as reviewers. In some instances, providing a list of journals and the number of manuscripts that have been reviewed is enough. In other cases, more formal tracking of an individual’s service may be needed.

Reviewers of ACS Publications journal articles can now receive public acknowledgment of their work, thanks to a collaboration with ORCID(Open Researcher and Contributor ID). Reviewers will be able to get credit through their ORCID profile, without revealing which article they’ve reviewed.

For more information on review credit, please refer to section 2.5.4 of the ACS Guide to Scholarly Communication.

RAMP Up Your Safety Education and Practice

ACS Chemical Health & Safety and the new ACS Center for Lab Safety (one of the seven learning centers found within the ACS Institute) are proud to sponsor the 2021 Virtual AIHceExp, the official conference of the American Industrial Hygienists Association (AIHA). 

This conference gathers annually over 3,900 industrial hygienists, environment, health and safety officers, safety professionals, and more. These are key readers, authors, and reviewers for ACS Chemical Health & Safety. They are also prospective learners who may find useful resources in the new ACS Center for Lab Safety, including “What is RAMP (Recognize hazards, Assess risk, Minimize risk, and Prepare for Emergencies).”

Join ACS Chemical Health & Safety and the ACS Center for Lab Safety on Wednesday, May 26th from 11:45 AM – 12:45 PM for a sponsored Lunch & Learn titled “RAMP Up Your Safety Education and Practice.” Kali A. Miller, Ph.D., Managing Editor of the journal, will present on relevant publication content and best practices in getting your manuscript published. She will also discuss how to start and sustain a student laboratory safety team. Tammy Hanna, Ph.D., Director of New Product Innovation, will then present on the ACS Center for Lab Safety.

Register to attend now!

ACS Chemical Health & Safety is a global platform for ensuring that the chemical enterprise receives access to new safety research works, information, regulatory updates, effective chemical hygiene practices, and hazard assessment tools. The journal maintains that good science is safe science – from concept to execution. Learn how to submit your work

The ACS Center for Lab Safety supports and promotes the safe, ethical, responsible, and sustainable practice of chemistry through easy access to authoritative tools, education, training, and guidance. Explore the learning and resources in this learning center from the ACS Institute

 

ACS Publications Materials Research Resources at E-MRS 2021

ACS Publications is proud to support the E-MRS 2021 Spring Meeting, taking place virtually from May 31 to June 3 2021. While we are missing seeing you all in person, we are pleased to present the range of materials research resources from ACS Publications, including special issues from ACS Publications journals, materials science ebooks, posters, presentations, and more.

Accounts of Materials Research

Accounts of Materials Research publishes concise personal reviews and perspectives describing recent research developments in all aspects of materials science and engineering.

Learn more about Editor-in-Chief Jiaxing Huang, explore recent issues, and sign up to receive email alerts and news from the journal.

ACS Applied Bio Materials

Led by Editor-in-Chief Kirk S. Schanze and Deputy Editor Shu Wang, ACS Applied Bio Materials is an interdisciplinary journal publishing original research covering all aspects of biomaterials and biointerfaces including and beyond the traditional biosensing, biomedical and therapeutic applications.

Check out the latest issue which features a collection of articles on functional biomaterials for infectious diseases, explore the most-read articles from the last 12 months, and register to receive email alerts and news from the journal.

ACS Applied Electronic Materials

ACS Applied Electronic Materials is an interdisciplinary journal publishing original research covering all aspects of electronic materials, led by Editor-in-Chief Kirk S. Schanze and Deputy Editor Hyun Jae Kim.

Explore the journal’s latest issue, plus the Virtual Issue ‘A Bright New World of Ferroelectrics: Magic of Spontaneous Polarization’, and register to receive email alerts and news from the journal.

ACS Applied Energy Materials

ACS Applied Energy Materials is an interdisciplinary journal publishing original research covering all aspects of materials, engineering, chemistry, physics and biology relevant to energy conversion and storage. Led by Editor-in-Chief Kirk S. Schanze and Deputy Editor Gerald Meyer, the journal is devoted to reports of new and original experimental and theoretical research of an applied nature that integrate knowledge in the areas of materials, engineering, physics, bioscience, and chemistry into important energy applications.

Take a look at the journal’s latest issue, explore the most-read articles, and sign up to receive email alerts and news from the journal.

ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces

ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces serves the interdisciplinary community of chemists, engineers, physicists, and biologists focusing on how newly-discovered materials and interfacial processes can be developed and used for specific applications. Led by Editor-in-Chief Kirk S. Schanze, the editors are proud of the rapid growth of the journal since its inception in 2009, both in terms of the number of published articles, the diversity of authorship, and the impact of the research reported in those articles.

Explore the latest issue, check out the articles on the journal’s most-read list, and register to receive email alerts and news from the journal. You can also follow the ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces portfolio of journals on Twitter at @ACS_AMI.

ACS Applied Nano Materials

Led by Editor-in-Chief Kirk S. Schanze and Deputy Editor T. Randall Lee, ACS Applied Nano Materials is an interdisciplinary journal publishing original research covering all aspects of engineering, chemistry, physics, and biology relevant to applications of nanomaterials.

Take a look at the journal’s latest issue, explore the journal’s most-read articles, and sign up to receive email alerts and news from the journal.

ACS Applied Polymer Materials

ACS Applied Polymer Materials is an interdisciplinary journal publishing original research covering all aspects of engineering, chemistry, physics, and biology relevant to applications of polymers.

Check out the Virtual Issue on ‘Polymer Materials for Solar Cells’, explore the journal’s latest issue, and see what articles appear in the journal’s most-read list.

ACS Materials Au

Fully open access journal with a broad scope including high-quality novel articles at the forefront of fundamental and applied research, and at the interface between materials and other disciplines, such as chemistry, engineering, and biology. Read a full description.

Meet the Editor, Professor Stephanie Brock, to learn more about open science and her aspirations for ACS Materials Au.

ACS Nano

ACS Nano is an international forum for the communication of comprehensive articles on nanoscience and nanotechnology research at the interfaces of chemistry, biology, materials science, physics, and engineering. Moreover, the journal helps facilitate communication among scientists from these research communities in developing new research opportunities, advancing the field through new discoveries, and reaching out to scientists at all levels.

Read the latest issue, explore articles from first-time authors, and catch up with nanoscience and nanotechnology research into solutions for the COVID-19 pandemic. To ensure you’re kept up-to-date with the journal, register to receive email alerts and news.

ACS Nanoscience Au

Fully open access journal with a broad scope including original, fundamental, and applied research on nanoscience and nanotechnology at the interfaces of chemistry, biology, medicine, materials science, physics, and engineering. Read a full description.

Meet the Editor, Professor Raymond Schaak, to learn more about open science and his hopes for ACS Nanoscience Au.

Nano Letters

Nano Letters is a forum for reporting original results on fundamental, applied, and emerging research in all areas of nanoscience and nanotechnology that require rapid dissemination. A chief criterion to fit within the scope of Nano Letters is the convergence of at least two different areas or disciplines. Find out more about the journal here.

Read Nano LettersViewpoints, short, forward-looking thought pieces highlighting emerging focus areas that will benefit the entire nanoscience community.

Chemistry of Materials

Chemistry of Materials is devoted to the publication of original contributions on the forefront of fundamental research at the interface of chemistry, chemical engineering, and materials science. Areas of interest include inorganic and organic solid-state chemistry, and polymer chemistry, especially as directed to the development of materials with novel and/or useful optical, electrical, magnetic, catalytic, and mechanical properties, among others. Find out more about the journal here.

Check out these special collections of articles: Reviews & Perspectives, Methods & Protocols, Up & Coming Perspectives, 1K Club.

ACS Materials Letters

ACS Materials Letters publishes high-quality and urgent contributions on the forefront of fundamental and applied research, at the interface between materials and other disciplines, such as chemistry, engineering, and biology. ACS Materials Letters is dedicated to publishing the most transformative materials research with very fast processing times. Find out more about the journal here.

Check out Reviews & Perspectives.

ACS Institute

The ACS Institute is a comprehensive and authoritative learning platform supporting the broad chemistry community across the spectrum of learning – foundational education, career expertise, and professional development. Offering a robust collection of learning and training resources to advance the chemistry community, over 100 learnings courses and assets within the ACS Institute have been organized into seven ACS Centers for ease of discovery.