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10 Chemistry Articles Everyone Was Reading in October 2022

There are many ways to measure an article’s success after it is published. One helpful method of evaluating a scientific publication’s reach and influence is by looking at how many times it has been read. Below, we have gathered a selection of recently published chemistry articles that were among the most read in October 2022 across all ACS Publications journals.*  

These articles cover a variety of topics, including Nobel-winning click chemistry, plastic degradation rates, PFAS, and more. We hope you find this content informative and useful. If you are interested in publishing in an ACS journal, click below to learn more about how your research can further our commitment to being the “Most Trusted. Most Cited. Most Read.” 

Learn More About Publishing with ACS

 

Presumptive Contamination: A New Approach to PFAS Contamination Based on Likely Sources

Presumptive Contamination: A New Approach to PFAS Contamination Based on Likely Sources
Derrick Salvatore, Kira Mok, Kimberly K. Garrett, Grace Poudrier, Phil Brown, Linda S. Birnbaum, Gretta Goldenman, Mark F. Miller, Sharyle Patton, Maddy Poehlein, Julia Varshavsky, and Alissa Cordner 
DOI: 10.1021/acs.estlett.2c00502 

 

On the Topic of Substrate Scope 

On the Topic of Substrate Scope 
Marisa C. Kozlowski 
DOI: 10.1021/acs.orglett.2c03246 

 

Introduction: Click Chemistry

Introduction: Click Chemistry 
Neal K. Devaraj and M. G. Finn 
DOI: 10.1021/acs.chemrev.1c00469 

 

Fewer Sandwich Papers, Please

Fewer Sandwich Papers, Please 
Song Jin 
DOI: 10.1021/acsenergylett.2c02197 

 

Improved Stability of Inverted and Flexible Perovskite Solar Cells with Carbon Electrode

Improved Stability of Inverted and Flexible Perovskite Solar Cells with Carbon Electrode 
Vivek Babu, Rosinda Fuentes Pineda, Taimoor Ahmad, Agustin O. Alvarez, Luigi Angelo Castriotta, Aldo Di Carlo, Francisco Fabregat-Santiago, and Konrad Wojciechowski 
DOI: 10.1021/acsaem.0c00702 

 

Operando Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of All-Solid-State Battery Interface: Redistribution of Lithium among Interconnected Particles

Operando Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of All-Solid-State Battery Interface: Redistribution of Lithium among Interconnected Particles 
Shibabrata Basak, Vadim Migunov, Amir H. Tavabi, Chandramohan George, Qing Lee, Paolo Rosi, Violetta Arszelewska, Swapna Ganapathy, Ashwin Vijay, Frans Ooms, Roland Schierholz, Hermann Tempel, Hans Kungl, Joachim Mayer, Rafal E. Dunin-Borkowski, Rüdiger-A. Eichel, Marnix Wagemaker, and Erik M. Kelder 
DOI: 10.1021/acsaem.0c00543 

 

Composition, Emissions, and Air Quality Impacts of Hazardous Air Pollutants in Unburned Natural Gas from Residential Stoves in California

Composition, Emissions, and Air Quality Impacts of Hazardous Air Pollutants in Unburned Natural Gas from Residential Stoves in California 
Eric D. Lebel, Drew R. Michanowicz, Kelsey R. Bilsback, Lee Ann L. Hill, Jackson S. W. Goldman, Jeremy K. Domen, Jessie M. Jaeger, Angélica Ruiz, and Seth B. C. Shonkoff 
DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.2c02581 

 

Degradation Rates of Plastics in the Environment

Degradation Rates of Plastics in the Environment 
Ali Chamas, Hyunjin Moon, Jiajia Zheng, Yang Qiu, Tarnuma Tabassum, Jun Hee Jang, Mahdi Abu-Omar, Susannah L. Scott, and Sangwon Suh 
DOI: 10.1021/acssuschemeng.9b06635 

 

Unified Access to Pyrimidines and Quinazolines Enabled by N–N Cleaving Carbon Atom Insertion

Unified Access to Pyrimidines and Quinazolines Enabled by N–N Cleaving Carbon Atom Insertion 
Ethan E. Hyland, Patrick Q. Kelly, Alexander M. McKillop, Balu D. Dherange, and Mark D. Levin  
DOI: 10.1021/jacs.2c09616 

 

Total Synthesis of Yuzurine-type Alkaloid Daphgraciline

Total Synthesis of Yuzurine-type Alkaloid Daphgraciline 
Li-Xuan Li, Long Min, Tian-Bing Yao, Shu-Xiao Ji, Chuang Qiao, Pei-Lin Tian, Jianwei Sun, and Chuang-Chuang Li 
DOI: 10.1021/jacs.2c09548


*This list was not chosen by the journals’ editors and should not be taken as a “best of” list, but as another perspective on where the chemistry community is recently allocating their attention.
 

Update on ACS Publications’ Name Change Policy: Two Years Later

ACS Publications recognizes and respects that authors may change their names for many reasons during their academic careers including—but not limited to—gender identity, marriage, divorce, or religious conversion. As part of ACS Publications’ commitment to reducing barriers to inclusion, equity, and professional mobility, we implemented an inclusive name change policy in October 2020, offering a more inclusive and author-centric path to updating one’s name on prior publications. Over the last two years, we have updated approximately 400 published articles. In doing so, nearly 100 researchers have rightfully claimed ownership of their academic work under their lived names.

Though this policy benefits anyone who changes their name, we were originally motivated to update our policy in response to a call from the transgender scientific community. For many researchers, particularly those from the transgender community, name changes can be a sensitive issue. Submitting change requests can be taxing—emotionally and administratively—especially for researchers who have published in multiple journals or across publishers whose policies and procedures may vary.

To help address this burden, in 2021 ACS Publications announced a partnership with the U.S. National Laboratories as they implemented their name change policy. The partnership with all seventeen U.S. National Laboratories enables researchers to ask the National Laboratories to pursue name changes on their behalf directly with participating publishers. This streamlined process reduces the emotional toll often associated with name changes and the administrative burden involved in requesting name changes at multiple publishers or journals. Over the last year, we have been diligently working to honor this partnership. We have also been advancing other planned improvements to our policy and processes.

We’re pleased to share that we can now accept name change requests submitted by an approved institutional representative on behalf of an author. Through a revised request form, institutional representatives can submit all the necessary information for ACS to process the change. Authors must still update their ACS Paragon Plus profile and ORCiD, and they must be copied on the request and made available for questions if needed. More information for interested authors and institutional representatives can be found on our policy page and FAQs.

We continue to encourage authors to submit requests on their own behalf, if their institution does not have a name change policy or they do not want to involve an institutional representative. For authors, the revised form allows them to provide more relevant information from the start of the request and aims to minimize the burden on the author later in the process. ACS staff might still contact the author throughout the process as questions arise. 

Through efforts like ACS’ name change policy, ACS Publications is committed to promoting diversity, equity, inclusion, and respect (DEIR), identifying and dismantling barriers to success, and creating a welcoming and supportive environment so that all ACS contributors, members, employees, and volunteers can thrive. We continue to actively listen to the community on these issues and welcome your feedback on how we are doing. Please complete our Diversity Feedback form to share your comments.

Visit the ACS Publications Name Change Policy Page

Learn About Our Commitment to Advancing DEIR

Share Your Feedback With Us!

Call for Papers: Electrified Membranes for Environmental Applications

Environmental pollution and the energy crisis have created an urgent demand to develop high-efficiency, cost-effective and sustainable technologies for water purification.

By integrating the advantages of electrochemistry and membrane separation, the electrified membrane has risen as a new-generation technology, as reflected by a rapid growth in the number of peer-reviewed publications in the last five years. There have been significant advances in the design of various electroactive materials, functionalization strategies, and reactor configurations. Both an understanding of the working mechanism and environmental applications are of essential importance to accelerate research and development, to explain the fundamental mechanisms and to address the practical challenges regarding widespread industrial applications.

This new Special Issue from ACS ES&T Engineering is seeking original and high-quality research and review articles that explore the remediation of environmental hazardous materials using electrified membranes. Both fundamental and applied research papers covering multidisciplinary topics will be considered.

The scope of the Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, the following topics:

  • Electrified membranes for the decontamination of heavy metal ions.
  • Electrified membranes for the inactivation of waterborne pathogens.
  • Electrified membranes for water and wastewater treatment.
  • Full-scale engineering applications of electrified membranes for water treatment.
  • Nanotechnology strengthened electrified membranes for water purification.
  • Electrified membranes for the treatment of emerging contaminants.
  • Advanced electroactive materials and functionalization strategies for water treatment.

Explore Research on Electrified Membranes in ACS Journals

Editors

Guest Editors:

  • Yanbiao Liu, Donghua University, China
  • Zhiwei Wang, Tongji University, China
  • Xing Xie, Georgia Institute of Technology, United States
  • Shijie You, Harbin Institute of Technology, China

Associate Editor:

  • Jaehong Kim, Yale University, United States

Author Instructions

To submit your manuscript, please visit the ACS ES&T Engineering website. Please follow the normal procedures for manuscript submission and when in the ACS Paragon Plus submission site, select the Special Issue of “Electrified Membranes for Environmental Applications.” All manuscripts will undergo rigorous peer review. For additional submission instructions, please see the ACS ES&T Engineering Author Guidelines.

The deadline for submissions is May 2, 2023.

Author Guidelines

Submit Your Manuscript

 

Semiconductors: The Building Blocks of Modern Technology

The global semiconductor industry is on the rise, with the potential to grow into a trillion-dollar industry by the end of the decade. In tandem, scientists continue to advance the field with quality research in semiconductor technology and applications. Here, we explore recent advances in semiconductor research across ACS Publications journals.

Tiny Powerhouses

Semiconductors are a class of crystalline solids whose electrical conductivity exists between that of a conductor, such as aluminum or copper, and an insulator, such as ceramic or glass—hence their “semi” conductive nature.1 These diverse substances, including two-dimensional (2D) materials, optoelectronics, and optical devices, have become the fundamental components of modern electronic technology.

Progress Toward Next-Generation Devices

In addition to silicon, novel materials such as graphene also have a high potential for applications as semiconductors in electronic devices. However, their high contact resistance makes them susceptible to overheating, and this limits their practical applications. Some scientists have begun investigating various options to lower the contact resistance, making 2D semiconductors a promising candidate for broader use in electronics.2

Some 2D semiconductor materials have recently been shown to exhibit magnetic properties, which could make them extremely useful for next-generation spintronic devices and information technology, such as logic circuits that utilize the spin interactions of electrons. By applying magnetic and other enhanced properties of certain semiconductors, spintronic devices could reduce energy consumption while increasing processing capabilities, making them a viable alternative to traditional electronics.3 To enhance these magnetic properties, one study explores doping suitable magnetic materials into host semiconductors at room temperature.3 Others are examining strategies to develop more high-temperature 2D magnetic semiconductors that could also one day be widely used in spintronics applications.4

The role of semiconductors in optoelectronic technology and applications has grown significantly in recent years. Semiconductor nanocrystals have displayed great potential in optoelectronics applications such as light-emitting diodes and lasers5, and organic–inorganic hybrid semiconductors such as organometal halide perovskites are also encouraging candidates for next-generation optoelectronics.6

A (Machine) Learning Process

Machine Learning (ML) is a growing field that has transformed research processes across various industries, including semiconductor production. For example, developing new semiconductors with high thermal conductivity may aid in heat management and energy conservation for device cooling—and ML algorithms can rapidly and accurately generate screenings to predict different semiconductor material properties, evaluate their potential applications, and create simulation models for extreme conditions.7

A recent study in ACS Applied Nano Materials describes a method for deep-learning-based microscopic imagery deblurring (MID), which helps to more accurately identify 2D semiconductors and may be useful in the industrial manufacturing process.8

Powering Renewable Energy Sources

Outside of the electronics industry, another important area of interest is the powerful role of semiconductors in sustainable energy generation. Researchers recently reported on a new type of semiconductor alloy “nanoflower” with great potential for use in water splitting and hydrogen production.9

Harnessing the power of the sun is no simple task, but semiconductors are also proving themselves essential for the future of solar energy conversion. The growing demand for effective yet inexpensive photovoltaic materials has prompted some to begin exploring alternative semiconductor options—such as copper sulfide (CuS), which could have great success in improving the stability and photoconversion efficiency in perovskite solar cells.10

Another study describes a strategy for improving perovskite solar cell performance by introducing 2D material films or semiconducting additives to better balance the charge transport, or the flow of electric current through the solar cell.11

Semiconductors are everywhere in our daily lives, and their impact continues to grow across a multitude of industries and applications. From driving the performance of next-generation electronics to improving technologies for a more sustainable future, these tiny powerhouses are vital for keeping the modern world running.

Further Reading: Recent Semiconductor Research from ACS Journals

  1. Huang, N. et al. Photosynthesis of Hydrogen and Its Synchronous Application in a Hydrogen Fuel Cell: A Comprehensive Experiment in the Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory. J. Chem. Educ. 2022, 99, 9, 3283–3288
  2. Protti, S. and Fagnoni, M. Recent Advances in Light-Induced Selenylation. ACS Org. Inorg. Au 2022, Article ASAP
  3. Park, H. et al. Reduction of the Error in the Electrical Characterization of Organic Field-Effect Transistors Based on Donor–Acceptor Polymer Semiconductors. ACS Appl. Electron. Mater. 2022, 4, 9, 4677–4682
  4. Abdelraouf, O.A.M. et al. Recent Advances in Tunable Metasurfaces: Materials, Design, and Applications. ACS Nano 2022, 16, 9, 13339–13369
  5. Bhall, N. et al. Endorsing a Hidden Plasmonic Mode for Enhancement of LSPR Sensing Performance in Evolved Metal–insulator Geometry Using an Unsupervised Machine Learning Algorithm. ACS Phys. Chem Au 2022, Article ASAP
  6. Shiraishi, Y. et al. Solar-Driven Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide on Phenol–Resorcinol–Formaldehyde Resin Photocatalysts. ACS Mater. Au 2022, 2, 6, 709–718

References

  1. Encyclopedia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/science/semiconductor
  2. Wu, Z. et al. Lowering Contact Resistances of Two-Dimensional Semiconductors by Memristive Forming. Nano Lett. 2022, 22, 17, 7094–7103
  3. Kanwal, S. et al. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Cu/Co Co-Doped ZnO Nanoparticles Prepared by the Co-Precipitation Method: For Spintronics Applications. ACS Omega 2022, 7, 36, 32184–32193
  4. Sun, H. et al. High-Temperature Ferromagnetism in a Two-Dimensional Semiconductor with a Rectangular Spin Lattice. J. Phys. Chem. C 2022, 126, 37, 16034–16041
  5. Brumberg, A. et al. Acceleration of Biexciton Radiative Recombination at Low Temperature in CdSe Nanoplatelets. Nano Lett. 2022, 22, 17, 6997–7004
  6. Li, Y. et al. Design of Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Heterostructured Semiconductors via High-Throughput Materials Screening for Optoelectronic Applications. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2022, 144, 36, 16656–16666
  7. Li, M. et al. Machine Learning for Harnessing Thermal Energy: From Materials Discovery to System Optimization. ACS Energy Lett. 2022, 7, 10, 3204–3226
  8. Dong, X. et al. Microscopic Image Deblurring by a Generative Adversarial Network for 2D Nanomaterials: Implications for Wafer-Scale Semiconductor Characterization. ACS Appl. Nano Mater. 2022, 5, 9, 12855–12864
  9. Aher, R. et al. Synthesis, Structural and Optical Properties of ZrBi2Se6 Nanoflowers: A Next-Generation Semiconductor Alloy Material for Optoelectronic Applications. ACS Omega 2022, 7, 36, 31877–31887
  10. Shaikh, G.Y. et al. Structural, Optical, Photoelectrochemical, and Electronic Properties of the Photocathode CuS and the Efficient CuS/CdS Heterojunction. ACS Omega 2022, 7, 34, 30233–30240
  11. Mei, Y. et al. Synergistic Effects of Bipolar Additives on Grain Boundary-Mediated Charge Transport for Efficient Carbon-Based Inorganic Perovskite Solar Cells. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2022, 14, 34, 38963–38971

Looking Ahead: The Future of Open Access

This post is part of a five-part series published in celebration of International Open Access Week 2022. We encourage you to explore the entire series below, which offers valuable insights and resources in support of advancing transparency and inclusion in the scientific community through open access.

OPEN ACCESS WEEK 2022 BLOG SERIES
Celebrate Open Access Week 2022 with ACS Publications
Fostering a Climate of Open Science
Open Access Copyright and Licensing: A Guide for Authors
The Journey to Open Access: Past and Present
Looking Ahead: The Future of Open Access

The OSTP Memo: Shaking Up the Open Access Landscape in the US 

On August 25, 2022, the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) released a statement requiring US federal funding agencies to put plans in place that will ensure immediate public access to all research, including published articles and all underlying research data. The memo encouraged funding agencies to begin adjusting their policies immediately, with implementation in place by or before the end of 2025. 

The impact of the OSTP Memo is still somewhat unclear, and it remains to be seen exactly how this will affect funders, researchers, and publishers in chemistry and its related fields – particularly as the Senate Committee for Science, Space, and Technology has requested clarification on several key points from the OSTP’s new Director, Dr. Arati Prabhakar. While there have been no formal policy responses yet, many researchers are funded by organizations such as the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy, and agencies’ responses are likely to mark a considerable change in how US-based researchers publish their work.  

“The announcement from OSTP represents a significant change in policy direction,” James Milne, president of ACS Publications, states in a recent Chemical & Engineering News article. “As such, we are evaluating the details of the guidance and accompanying economic analysis to determine the potential impact on both our publishing activities and on US researchers directly.”

Register for Today’s Webinar, “The OSTP Memo and its Impact on Chemistry” 

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EDT / 16:00 PM – 17:00 PM BST 
Co-Sponsored by the ACS Division of Chemical Information 

This session brings together diverse viewpoints to discuss how the OSTP memo, the ensuing funder mandates, and publishers’ responses will shape the future of chemistry publishing. If you haven’t done so already, register below to attend or receive a free recording of the webinar. 

To keep you up to date on the latest Open Science news and policies, we will be updating information regularly on the ACS Open Science Resource Center as and when additional funder mandates are announced.  

Register Now

OPEN ACCESS WEEK 2022 BLOG SERIES
Celebrate Open Access Week 2022 with ACS Publications
Fostering a Climate of Open Science
Open Access Copyright and Licensing: A Guide for Authors
The Journey to Open Access: Past and Present
Looking Ahead: The Future of Open Access

Library Life: Interview with Northwestern University Librarian Elsa Alvaro

Elsa Alvaro

Elsa Alvaro is Head of Academic Engagement and the Librarian for Chemistry and Chemical and Biological Engineering at the Northwestern University Libraries.

Tell me about your current role:

My job as Head of Academic Engagement involves connecting the Northwestern community with the library’s collections, services, and expertise; overseeing two of Northwestern’s most notable libraries, the Transportation Library and the Herskovits Library of African Studies; and supporting student success connected to the library in a variety of ways, from directing orientation programs for undergraduate and graduate students to managing technology-rich spaces in which students can collaborate, learn and create. I am also the Librarian for Chemistry and Chemical and Biological Engineering.

What is your background?

I am originally from Spain and have a PhD in Chemistry. After obtaining my postdoc at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, I decided to pursue a degree in Library Science. It was at that time that I was awarded the ACS Division of Chemical Information Lucille Wert award, which started my involvement with CINF. I joined Northwestern as a chemistry librarian in 2013 and in 2019, I advanced to a leadership position in the library, becoming Head of Academic Engagement.

How do you help to address challenges faced by your institution’s students and faculty?

By putting librarians at the heart of academic life! We are an indispensable thread in the academic fabric.

For students, we do that by acknowledging the many different facets that define their experience at Northwestern University; those facets are opportunities to help students succeed. For example, if you are a chemistry major, we have a subject librarian specializing in your field who can help you discover the resources you need for rigorous research. If you are conducting undergraduate research, we have you covered there, too; we offer a summer grant for undergraduate students and a librarian works with the Office of Undergraduate Research to make sure we are addressing your unique concerns. For those who are studying abroad or interested in entrepreneurship, we have partnerships, tools, and resources to support those needs. Our engagement efforts extend to other aspects of the student experience, including new student programs and orientations, and end of term programming to support student well-being.

What are some trends that you are observing in the library world right now?

Academic libraries preserve, produce and provide access to knowledge. But we do not live in a bubble – our mission is connected to advancing research, teaching and learning at our institutions. That means that trends and challenges that impact universities, researchers, and society in general, are going to influence and shape our work. In the past years we have seen an increase in openness in the communication of research; and we are also observing that more fields are embracing AI and machine learning. Those trends have implications for us, including making available the work of our institutions (though licensing agreements, but also by being publishers), and the need to have a robust digital strategy and infrastructure.

As a result of the pandemic and understanding that the library is a workplace, one important current issue is how to be an equitable and inclusive community in which all library workers have the support to succeed in their roles.

What areas of interest are you focused on right now? 

My background as a chemist and a researcher strongly influences my approach to my job as librarian. I’m always looking forward to challenges, and I love to develop new programs to address gaps or unmet needs. For example, we are launching a new service to support systematic reviews and other types of evidence syntheses; this type of reviews is common in fields such as medical research but not so much in other disciplines. I am interested in bridging that gap, for instance by providing workshops and consultations in different aspects of the review process, and collaborating with researchers in projects.

You were also the chair of ACS’s Chemical Information (CINF) division in 2019. What was that like?

It was truly terrific. The experiences, opportunities and connections that I got through CINF have been key in my professional career, so I was honored and delighted to serve as chair. CINF is unique in the way it brings together informatics, librarianship, and data expertise in one community. Also, CINF officers and volunteers are a welcoming, talented, and supportive group of people, and a joy to work with. I was pleased that we engaged in strategic planning during my tenure.

A very important question: Who is your favorite scientist?

My spouse. Hands down. He is a theoretical physicist who works in neuromorphic computing and materials growth. Neuromorphic computing is a computer engineering approach that models and develops computing devices inspired by the human brain.

What is a fun fact about Northwestern University?

In 1921, Nobel Prize-winning chemist Marie Curie visited Northwestern University with her daughter to receive an honorary degree. During her visit, 100 area women coordinated a fundraising campaign and raised $100,000 (this would be over $1.4 million today!) to allow Madame Curie to purchase one gram of radium to continue her studies.

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Read More Library Life Interviews

The Journey to Open Access: Past and Present

This post is part of a five-part series published in celebration of International Open Access Week 2022. We encourage you to explore the entire series below, which offers valuable insights and resources in support of advancing transparency and inclusion in the scientific community through open access.

OPEN ACCESS WEEK 2022 BLOG SERIES
Celebrate Open Access Week 2022 with ACS Publications
Fostering a Climate of Open Science
Open Access Copyright and Licensing: A Guide for Authors
The Journey to Open Access: Past and Present
Looking Ahead: The Future of Open Access

Defining Open Access: The Early Years 

The term “open access” (OA) has been around for more than two decades, but the movement to make scientific research more openly and publicly available began well before it even had a name. 

With the rise of the internet in the 1990s, communicating and sharing knowledge with others around the world became easier than ever. Early repositories such as arXiv.org enabled researchers to post and archive their own research prior to official publication, setting the groundwork for modern-day preprint servers.  

It wasn’t until the early 2000s, with the release of the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) in 2002, that “open access” emerged as the defining term for scholarly research that is openly available online, accessible to everyone, and unrestricted by paywalls or financial barriers. 

OA—both the term and the movement—quickly began gaining traction internationally, and it was further expanded upon in 2003 with the publication of both the Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing and the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities. These two statements, along with the BOAI, helped form what philosopher and OA pioneer Peter Suber first referred to as the “BBB Definition” of open access. 

A Growing Movement 

ACS Central Science - Inaugural Cover

The OA movement continued to develop throughout the 2010s, with the launch of many policies, campaigns, initiatives, and journals in support of making scholarly research freely and publicly available online. In 2015, ACS launched its first fully OA journal—ACS Central Science—with an infinity symbol on its inaugural cover to represent “no limits to the reach of chemistry and no barriers to access for interested readers and authors.”  

Then, in 2018, a group of funders across Europe (known as cOAlition S) caused a tremendous stir in the scientific publishing world by launching Plan S—an initiative stating that by 2021, all researchers funded by these agencies will be required to publish in fully OA journals, making their research openly available with a broad CC BY license immediately upon publication. To better align with Plan S requirements, ACS Publications worked with cOAlition S to award its full portfolio of subscription journals with Transformative Journal status. This now allows researchers funded by Plan S participants to have more flexibility in choosing where to publish within the ACS journal portfolio.  

Today’s Global Open Access Landscape 

Although the OA movement is widely regarded on a global scale, its implementation has varied quite a bit around the world.  

Since the launch of Plan S, Europe has remained a leader in its mandate-driven support for OA. With the implementation of Horizon Europealongside an approved research and innovation budget of almost €100 billion for 2021-2027—the European Union has now become one of the biggest OA funders in the world.  

North America is less driven by widespread, regional mandates, but rather by various discipline-specific funder mandates such as those established by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.  These approaches are likely to evolve in the near future with the issuance of the recent OSTP “Nelson Memo,” Ensuring Free, Immediate, and Equitable Access to Federally Funded Research; this sets out recommendations around public access to research outputs and scientific data that are applicable to all federal research funders’ own public access policies. 

The primary drivers for OA in Latin America have been academic institutions and government organizations rather than commercial publishers. Currently, there is a priority for Green OA, in which the author publishes in a subscription-based journal and places a copy of their work in an institutional or discipline-based repository (known as “self-archiving”). 

China and India currently lead the way in OA publishing for Asian countries, but the movement in Asia overall has been slower than that of Europe or the United States. OA mandates are not as common, and many researchers are still uninformed of the various OA policies and licensing options—more widespread OA resources, as well as additional government funding, may be required to move the needle forward.  

How ACS Supports Open Access Publishing for All 

As more and more authors are being required by their countries or institutions to publish in OA journals, one of the biggest challenges is the rising cost of Article Processing Charges (APCs). Many researchers, particularly those in developing countries and low-income settings, cannot afford the APCs required to publish in an OA journal.  

ACS Publications is fully committed to making OA publishing an opportunity available to everyone, regardless of institution, country, or policy. Read below to learn more about the ways in which we help authors navigate OA requirements and ensure they have the means to publish OA in any of our journals: 

Read + Publish Agreements
Also known as “transformative agreements,” these are agreements in which an institution pays to receive full access to all articles in ACS journals as well as APC credits that allow researchers to publish OA across the entire ACS journal portfolio. Read + Publish Agreements eliminate the burden of cost for the author while satisfying funder requirements and making the research globally available. 

ACS Transformative Journals
All of ACS Publications’ hybrid journals now qualify as Plan S-compliant transformative journals, and many funders will fully cover the publication costs associated with publishing OA in these journals. This support will be offered until 31 December 2024.   

Country Discount & Waiver Policy
ACS provides discounts and full waivers to corresponding authors from qualifying low- and lower-middle-income countries.  

Interested in learning more about how ACS Publications can help you navigate the open access landscape and easily get your work published in our journals? Visit our all-new Open Science Resource Center to get started on your OA journey. 

Visit the New Open Science Resource Center

Take Your Next Steps Towards Open Science

Take the Open Access Survey

Open Access Copyright and Licensing: A Guide for Authors

This post is part of a five-part series published in celebration of International Open Access Week 2022. We encourage you to explore the entire series below, which offers valuable insights and resources in support of advancing transparency and inclusion in the scientific community through open access.

OPEN ACCESS WEEK 2022 BLOG SERIES
Celebrate Open Access Week 2022 with ACS Publications
Fostering a Climate of Open Science
Open Access Copyright and Licensing: A Guide for Authors
The Journey to Open Access: Past and Present
Looking Ahead: The Future of Open Access

Which Licensing Option is Right for You? 

As global support for open access publishing continues to grow, it is more important than ever as an author to understand the options for protecting your published work and determining the extent to which others may use, share, or build upon your research.  

When publishing open access in an ACS journal, you will sign a Journal Publishing Agreement upon acceptance of your manuscript. As part of this process you’ll have the choice of two Creative Commons (CC) licenses—CC-BY or CC-BY-NC-ND—which will allow you to share your work publicly while still maintaining copyright. Below is an overview of each licensing option to help determine which is best for you. 

CC BY: Attribution 

CC BY Licensing Option

CC BY is the less restrictive of the two licensing options offered by ACS Publications. Under a CC BY license, others can share, modify, and expand upon your work, both for commercial and non-commercial purposes. Even so—and this is where the “BY” comes into play—others must attribute you as the original author and creator of the published work. 
 

CC BY-NC-ND: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 

CC BY-NC-ND Licensing Option

The CC BY-NC-ND licensing option contains more limitations: others are permitted to share your work, but they can only do so for non-commercial use (NC) and they cannot modify or expand upon the work in any way (ND). As with CC BY, others are required to credit you as the original author.  

If you are unsure which licensing option to choose, it is best to start by confirming any licensing requirements already established by your research funder. You can also easily check this on the ACS Journal Finder by indicating your funder and/or institution in the search tool.  

To learn more about licensing options, visit the Creative Commons website.   

Additional Resources 

How to Publish Open Access with ACS

ACS Read + Publish Agreements

Open Access Pricing

Fostering a Climate of Open Science

This post is part of a five-part series published in celebration of International Open Access Week 2022. We encourage you to explore the entire series below, which offers valuable insights and resources in support of advancing transparency and inclusion in the scientific community through open access.

OPEN ACCESS WEEK 2022 BLOG SERIES
Celebrate Open Access Week 2022 with ACS Publications
Fostering a Climate of Open Science
Open Access Copyright and Licensing: A Guide for Authors
The Journey to Open Access: Past and Present
Looking Ahead: The Future of Open Access

Open Access vs. Open Science—What’s the Difference?

“Open access” and “Open Science” are terms frequently used in the scientific and scholarly publishing communities, but they are not the same. Open access refers to the process of making research articles openly and freely available for anyone who wants to access them. However, it is just one piece of the Open Science puzzle.

Open Science describes a broad, collective movement with a goal of increasing transparency and access across all components of the research process beyond the traditional article—including open peer review, data repositories, scholarly communication, and much more. Open Science champions a globally inclusive landscape built on collaboration across academic fields and among researchers around the world.

ACS Publications is at the forefront of initiatives, products, and services supporting open access and the broader, ever-evolving Open Science landscape. Read below to learn more about our commitment to Open Science and the various resources available for our community.

ChemRxiv: Celebrating Five Years of Preprints

ChemRxiv: Celebrating Five Years of Preprints

Launched in 2017, ChemRxiv serves as the primary preprint server for the global chemistry community. By allowing authors to share initial versions of their manuscripts online prior to formal peer review, ChemRxiv supports the Open Science goals of global collaboration and advancing scientific progress through the timely sharing of research.

Now in its fifth year, ChemRxiv is home to more than 14,000 unique preprints across all fields of chemistry, which have generated nearly 38 million views and downloads.

SciMeetings: Global Visibility Beyond the Conference

SciMeetings: Global Visibility Beyond the Conference

SciMeetings is an ACS platform that helps researchers easily and openly share their work presented at conferences and events. SciMeetings is an invaluable tool that offers worldwide visibility for conference posters and presentations, extending reach and impact beyond that of a typical week-long scientific meeting. All published items receive a DOI, enabling them to be easily cited by others. 

More than 273,000 research items have been uploaded to SciMeetings since its launch in 2020, and the platform continues to grow and support researchers in alignment with Open Science goals.

Toward Greater Transparency in Peer Review

Toward Greater Transparency in Peer Review

Peer review is an essential step in the publishing process, but it has traditionally existed as a confidential exchange between authors and reviewers. To support our commitment to Open Science objectives, ACS Publications launched a transparent peer review pilot in ACS Central Science and The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters in 2021, providing authors with the option to make their peer review correspondence publicly available (while still maintaining reviewer anonymity).

Transparent peer review allows readers and emerging researchers to gain a better understanding of an article’s journey through the peer review process, and it also upholds research integrity by instilling a higher level of accountability for authors, reviewers, and editors. To date, the transparent peer review pilot has resulted in more than 250 published papers with publicly available peer review correspondence.  

Taking Data Sharing to a New Level

Taking Data Sharing to a New Level

Around the same time as the 2021 transparent peer review pilot launch, ACS Publications also announced a new Research Data Policy aimed at establishing open data sharing as the eventual norm across all journals. At the initial Level 1 of this four-level policy, authors are strongly encouraged to make the data associated with their research openly available for ease of analysis, comparison, and even reproducibility by others in the field.

One year later, three journals decided it was time to level up. in September 2022, ACS Publications launched a new Data Availability Statement pilot for The Journal of Organic ChemistryOrganic Letters, and ACS Organic & Inorganic Au. These journals now fall under Level 2 of the Research Data Policy, which requires authors to submit a statement describing the availability status of all supporting data associated with the article’s results. Although still in its early days, this new pilot has great potential to lead more journals into further supporting Open Science through the public visibility and sharing of research data.    

Our commitment to Open Science is ever-growing. If you are interested in learning more about how ACS Publications supports the Open Science movement, visit our all-new Open Science Resource Center to find out how you can take the next step toward making science more accessible for all.

Visit the New Open Science Resource Center

Take Your Next Steps Towards Open Science

Take the Open Access Survey

Celebrate Open Access Week 2022 with ACS Publications

This post is part of a five-part series published in celebration of International Open Access Week 2022. We encourage you to explore the entire series below, which offers valuable insights and resources in support of advancing transparency and inclusion in the scientific community through open access.

OPEN ACCESS WEEK 2022 BLOG SERIES
Celebrate Open Access Week 2022 with ACS Publications
Fostering a Climate of Open Science
Open Access Copyright and Licensing: A Guide for Authors
The Journey to Open Access: Past and Present
Looking Ahead: The Future of Open Access

Visit the All-New ACS Publications Open Science Resource Center

ACS Publications is a long-time supporter of, and leader in, open access. Our commitment to the open science movement is reflected across our author-focused open access programs, ACS Read + Publish Agreements, and a wealth of resources available for authors and administrators to understand and navigate the ever-evolving open access landscape.

Visit our Open Science Resource Center (now with a new look!) to learn more about our dedication to open access and explore resources including:

ACS Transformative Journals
Read + Publish Agreements
ACS Open Science Programs
Open Science Policies

Visit the New Open Science Resource Center

Take Your Next Steps Towards Open Science

Take the Open Access Survey

Open Access Week 2022 Webinar Series

This week-long webinar series brings together researchers, funders, institutions, librarians, publishers, and open access advocates. Participants will learn about the latest developments in open access publishing from speakers at every stage in the academic publishing community.

It’s not too late to sign up! Registrants will be able to access all webinar recordings. An overview of the agenda is provided below.

Register Now

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24
Mythbusting Open Access in the Chemical Sciences
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM EDT / 15:00 PM – 16:00 PM BST

The Role of Institutions in Fostering a Climate of Open Science
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EDT / 16:00 PM – 17:00 PM BST 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25
Copyright for Researchers
12:00 PM – 13:00 PM EDT / 17:00 PM – 18:00 PM BST

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27
Open Access for Early Career Researchers
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM EDT / 12:00 PM – 13:00 PM BST

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28
Preprints in Chemistry – Now and Next
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM EDT / 15:00 PM – 16:00 PM BST

The OSTP ‘Nelson’ Memo and its Impact on Chemistry
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EDT / 16:00 PM – 17:00 PM BST