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Semiconductors: The Building Blocks of Modern Technology

The global semiconductor industry is on the rise, with the potential to grow into a trillion-dollar industry by the end of the decade. In tandem, scientists continue to advance the field with quality research in semiconductor technology and applications. Here, we explore recent advances in semiconductor research across ACS Publications journals.

Tiny Powerhouses

Semiconductors are a class of crystalline solids whose electrical conductivity exists between that of a conductor, such as aluminum or copper, and an insulator, such as ceramic or glass—hence their “semi” conductive nature.1 These diverse substances, including two-dimensional (2D) materials, optoelectronics, and optical devices, have become the fundamental components of modern electronic technology.

Progress Toward Next-Generation Devices

In addition to silicon, novel materials such as graphene also have a high potential for applications as semiconductors in electronic devices. However, their high contact resistance makes them susceptible to overheating, and this limits their practical applications. Some scientists have begun investigating various options to lower the contact resistance, making 2D semiconductors a promising candidate for broader use in electronics.2

Some 2D semiconductor materials have recently been shown to exhibit magnetic properties, which could make them extremely useful for next-generation spintronic devices and information technology, such as logic circuits that utilize the spin interactions of electrons. By applying magnetic and other enhanced properties of certain semiconductors, spintronic devices could reduce energy consumption while increasing processing capabilities, making them a viable alternative to traditional electronics.3 To enhance these magnetic properties, one study explores doping suitable magnetic materials into host semiconductors at room temperature.3 Others are examining strategies to develop more high-temperature 2D magnetic semiconductors that could also one day be widely used in spintronics applications.4

The role of semiconductors in optoelectronic technology and applications has grown significantly in recent years. Semiconductor nanocrystals have displayed great potential in optoelectronics applications such as light-emitting diodes and lasers5, and organic–inorganic hybrid semiconductors such as organometal halide perovskites are also encouraging candidates for next-generation optoelectronics.6

A (Machine) Learning Process

Machine Learning (ML) is a growing field that has transformed research processes across various industries, including semiconductor production. For example, developing new semiconductors with high thermal conductivity may aid in heat management and energy conservation for device cooling—and ML algorithms can rapidly and accurately generate screenings to predict different semiconductor material properties, evaluate their potential applications, and create simulation models for extreme conditions.7

A recent study in ACS Applied Nano Materials describes a method for deep-learning-based microscopic imagery deblurring (MID), which helps to more accurately identify 2D semiconductors and may be useful in the industrial manufacturing process.8

Powering Renewable Energy Sources

Outside of the electronics industry, another important area of interest is the powerful role of semiconductors in sustainable energy generation. Researchers recently reported on a new type of semiconductor alloy “nanoflower” with great potential for use in water splitting and hydrogen production.9

Harnessing the power of the sun is no simple task, but semiconductors are also proving themselves essential for the future of solar energy conversion. The growing demand for effective yet inexpensive photovoltaic materials has prompted some to begin exploring alternative semiconductor options—such as copper sulfide (CuS), which could have great success in improving the stability and photoconversion efficiency in perovskite solar cells.10

Another study describes a strategy for improving perovskite solar cell performance by introducing 2D material films or semiconducting additives to better balance the charge transport, or the flow of electric current through the solar cell.11

Semiconductors are everywhere in our daily lives, and their impact continues to grow across a multitude of industries and applications. From driving the performance of next-generation electronics to improving technologies for a more sustainable future, these tiny powerhouses are vital for keeping the modern world running.

Further Reading: Recent Semiconductor Research from ACS Journals

  1. Huang, N. et al. Photosynthesis of Hydrogen and Its Synchronous Application in a Hydrogen Fuel Cell: A Comprehensive Experiment in the Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory. J. Chem. Educ. 2022, 99, 9, 3283–3288
  2. Protti, S. and Fagnoni, M. Recent Advances in Light-Induced Selenylation. ACS Org. Inorg. Au 2022, Article ASAP
  3. Park, H. et al. Reduction of the Error in the Electrical Characterization of Organic Field-Effect Transistors Based on Donor–Acceptor Polymer Semiconductors. ACS Appl. Electron. Mater. 2022, 4, 9, 4677–4682
  4. Abdelraouf, O.A.M. et al. Recent Advances in Tunable Metasurfaces: Materials, Design, and Applications. ACS Nano 2022, 16, 9, 13339–13369
  5. Bhall, N. et al. Endorsing a Hidden Plasmonic Mode for Enhancement of LSPR Sensing Performance in Evolved Metal–insulator Geometry Using an Unsupervised Machine Learning Algorithm. ACS Phys. Chem Au 2022, Article ASAP
  6. Shiraishi, Y. et al. Solar-Driven Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide on Phenol–Resorcinol–Formaldehyde Resin Photocatalysts. ACS Mater. Au 2022, 2, 6, 709–718

References

  1. Encyclopedia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/science/semiconductor
  2. Wu, Z. et al. Lowering Contact Resistances of Two-Dimensional Semiconductors by Memristive Forming. Nano Lett. 2022, 22, 17, 7094–7103
  3. Kanwal, S. et al. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Cu/Co Co-Doped ZnO Nanoparticles Prepared by the Co-Precipitation Method: For Spintronics Applications. ACS Omega 2022, 7, 36, 32184–32193
  4. Sun, H. et al. High-Temperature Ferromagnetism in a Two-Dimensional Semiconductor with a Rectangular Spin Lattice. J. Phys. Chem. C 2022, 126, 37, 16034–16041
  5. Brumberg, A. et al. Acceleration of Biexciton Radiative Recombination at Low Temperature in CdSe Nanoplatelets. Nano Lett. 2022, 22, 17, 6997–7004
  6. Li, Y. et al. Design of Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Heterostructured Semiconductors via High-Throughput Materials Screening for Optoelectronic Applications. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2022, 144, 36, 16656–16666
  7. Li, M. et al. Machine Learning for Harnessing Thermal Energy: From Materials Discovery to System Optimization. ACS Energy Lett. 2022, 7, 10, 3204–3226
  8. Dong, X. et al. Microscopic Image Deblurring by a Generative Adversarial Network for 2D Nanomaterials: Implications for Wafer-Scale Semiconductor Characterization. ACS Appl. Nano Mater. 2022, 5, 9, 12855–12864
  9. Aher, R. et al. Synthesis, Structural and Optical Properties of ZrBi2Se6 Nanoflowers: A Next-Generation Semiconductor Alloy Material for Optoelectronic Applications. ACS Omega 2022, 7, 36, 31877–31887
  10. Shaikh, G.Y. et al. Structural, Optical, Photoelectrochemical, and Electronic Properties of the Photocathode CuS and the Efficient CuS/CdS Heterojunction. ACS Omega 2022, 7, 34, 30233–30240
  11. Mei, Y. et al. Synergistic Effects of Bipolar Additives on Grain Boundary-Mediated Charge Transport for Efficient Carbon-Based Inorganic Perovskite Solar Cells. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2022, 14, 34, 38963–38971

Need a Circuit? Just Print One

This article is based on a recent paper published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, “Thermal Transfer-Enabled Rapid Printing of Liquid Metal Circuits on Multiple Substrates.”

Read the full paper here

As electronics evolve, their component parts—including circuits—need to as well. New research published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces describes a method to print functional liquid circuitry on all manner of objects and surfaces—from smooth ceramics to the dimpled skin of an orange—using a standard laser printer.

Flexible Circuitry: Finding a Solution that Sticks

Most circuit boards used today are built with rigid materials, but as electronics become more widely incorporated in malleable products such as items of clothing or soft robots, there is now a greater need for flexible, low-cost circuitry. Liquid metal circuits have shown to be a promising solution, but current printing methods have proven to be both expensive and complex, rendering them impractical for large-scale production. Xian Huang and colleagues at Tanjin University in China began exploring a new printing approach in hopes of developing a cheaper, more efficient way of fabricating liquid metal circuits for use across many different materials.

While liquid metals have been used for a variety of applications in flexible materials and electronics, their high surface tension often leads to pattern distortion and weaker adhesive properties—making it difficult to successfully print directly on curved or uneven surfaces. To improve this process, the researchers presented a more universal technique for creating circuit patterns on thermal transfer paper using a standard desktop laser printer and Cu−Ag-EGaIn—a liquid metal obtained by melting silver−copper microparticles in a gallium−indium eutectic alloy.

Turning Any Surface Into a Circuit Board

Similar to iron-on decals for transferring photos or images onto clothing, the carbon-based toner was laid down by the laser printer and then heat-transferred to a pane of glass. The toner patterns roughened the glass and created a hydrophobic gap of air between the carbon and the Cu−Ag-EGaIn liquid metal, allowing only the exposed parts of the surface to stick to the electronic ink-based pattern when the liquid metal was brushed on top. The resulting circuit could then be mounted directly onto smooth surfaces, or, after applying a flexible polymer coating, onto rougher materials such as the bumpy skin of an orange.

Regardless of how they were attached, the simple electronics tested in the lab—which included LED displays, sound sensors, and radio-frequency identification (RFID) circuits—all functioned as intended on their underlying surfaces. These included wettable substrates such as thermoplastic polyurethane and glass as well as low-adhesion materials such as knitted fabric, paper, wood, and fruit. By demonstrating a cheaper, easier method of producing liquid metal circuits, this new technology has great potential to expand flexible circuitry across applications such as consumer electronics, health monitoring, wearable devices, and more.

Watch the video around this research created by the ACS Science Communications team:

Read the Full Press Release

Read the Original Article

Discover more research on liquid metals in ACS journals

  1. Kim, S. et al. Liquid-Metal-Coated Magnetic Particles toward Writable, Nonwettable, Stretchable Circuit Boards, and Directly Assembled Liquid Metal-Elastomer Conductors. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2022, 14, 32, 37110–37119
  2. Huang, C. et al. Soft and Stretchable Liquid Metal–Elastomer Composite for Wearable Electronics. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2022, 14, 33, 38196–38204
  3. Bhuyan, P. et al. Soft and Stretchable Liquid Metal Composites with Shape Memory and Healable Conductivity. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2021, 13, 24, 28916–28924
  4. Lopes, P.A. et al. Bi-Phasic Ag–In–Ga-Embedded Elastomer Inks for Digitally Printed, Ultra-Stretchable, Multi-layer Electronics. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2021, 13, 12, 14552–14561
  5. Choi, D.Y. et al. Highly Stretchable, Hysteresis-Free Ionic Liquid-Based Strain Sensor for Precise Human Motion Monitoring. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2017, 9, 2, 1770–1780

What We Owe to Raney® Nickel

What do microwave popcorn, biscuits, margarine spreads, and coffee creamers have in common? Aside from making you hungry, these foods are made possible thanks to hydrogenation. We may not give a lot of thought to hydrogenation, but it’s used in everything from foods and makeup to petrochemical products.

One widely used catalyst that makes hydrogenation possible is a metallic alloy called Raney® nickel. This nickel-aluminum alloy was invented to transform cottonseed oil from a liquid into a semi-solid shortening. A series of hydrogenation experiments by chemist Murray Raney in Chattanooga, Tennessee, between 1915 and 1926 for the Chattanooga Research Company led to its discovery.1 The first patent was issued in 1925,2 with a second in 1927.3

The discovery opened the door for hydrogenation of oils, fats, and waxes in a variety of food and industrial applications. On April 7, 2022—95 years later—the American Chemical Society granted Raney nickel National Historic Chemical Landmark status.4

What Is Hydrogenation?

We commonly think of hydrogenation as a chemical process that adds texture and shelf-life to foods, but it also extends to industrial applications.

In the food industry, hydrogenation is used to solidify liquid fats fully or partially. In the petrochemical industry, hydrogenation transforms a class of unsaturated hydrocarbons called “alkenes”5—which are used to produce alcohols, plastics, lacquers, detergents, and fuels6—into saturated and less reactive forms known as “alkanes” (e.g., paraffins) and cycloalkanes (e.g., cyclic hydrocarbons, or naphthenes).7,8

The hydrogenation process involves hydrogen and another compound. Because hydrogen is generally unreactive with organic compounds, however, a catalyst is needed. Raney nickel is widely used to make a variety of catalysts for this purpose.7

What Is Raney Nickel?

In the 1920s, when Murray Raney was experimenting with nickel alloys, he patented two versions. The first version contained equal parts nickel and silicon, which was then treated with sodium hydroxide.2 His version was found to be five times more active than the existing nickel-based industry standard. Raney continued to experiment and devised a subsequent catalyst using equal parts nickel and aluminum, which forms the basis of Raney nickel catalysts still in use today.3 Promoters such as zinc, molybdenum, and chromium are also sometimes added for different uses.9

Writing in 1940, Raney noted the importance of basic research in exploring the catalytic properties of metals:

The probability that nickel or any other metal will catalyze a given reaction is based on the great amount of work that has been done in many fields, rather than on any correlated, calculable properties of either the catalyzing substance or the reacting elements or compounds. The catalytic value of a substance is determined by trial; if it does its work, it is good.10

Since his original catalysts were devised, the world has bent Raney’s discovery to a vast array of uses. At the broadest level, Raney nickel is used today as a catalyst to help convert building-block chemicals into pharmaceuticals, food ingredients, personal care products, agrochemicals, and petroleum processing.4,11 Today, W. R. Grace & Co produces a variety of catalysts for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation using Raney nickel.

Since its discovery, Raney nickel has been used in a variety of oxidative and reductive applications including:

Novel uses of Raney Nickel

Today, new uses are being explored for Raney nickel. One application is in the emerging field of biomass conversion, where it is used as a catalyst to upgrade raw biomass into biofuels.12,13 With the admirable goal of weaning the world off fossil fuels, this use of Raney nickel may prove to be its most valuable contribution yet. Another use is as a catalyst for hydrogenation to synthesize cariprazine, an anti-psychotic drug used in the treatment of schizophrenia.14

References

  1. The Discoverer of Raney Nickel. Raymond B. Seymour. Chemical and Engineering News Archive, 1947, 25 (37), p 2628. DOI:10.1021/cen-v025n037
  2. Method of Preparing Catalytic Material [US Patent Application]. Murray Raney. 1924, https://patents.google.com/patent/US1563587A/en
  3. Method of Producing Finely-Divided Nickel [US Patent Application]. Murray Raney. May 10, 1927, https://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/30/af/21/aca0026193570c/US1628190.pdf
  4. Development of Raney Nickel Catalyst Earns Historic Chemical Landmark Designation [Press Release]. American Chemical Society. April 6, 2022, https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2022/april/development-of-raney-nickel-catalyst-earns-historic-chemical-landmark-designation.html
  5. Alkenes. LibreTexts Chemistry. Updated September 13, 2020, https://chem.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/Organic_Chemistry/Supplemental_Modules_(Organic_Chemistry)/Alkenes
  6. Alkenes. ByJu’s. Accessed April 14, 2022, https://byjus.com/chemistry/alkene/
  7. Hydrogenation: Catalysts. Wikipedia. Updated February 8, 2022, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogenation#Catalysts
  8. Naphthenes. ScienceDirect. Accessed April 14, 2022, https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/engineering/naphthenes
  9. Raney Nickel. Wikipedia. Updated December 21, 2021, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raney_nickel
  10. Catalysts from Alloys. Murray Raney. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 1940, 32 (9), pp 1199–1203. DOI: 10.1021/ie50369a030
  11. Chemical Processing. GRACE. Accessed April 14, 2022, https://grace.com/industries/chemical-processing
  12. Raney Ni as a Versatile Catalyst for Biomass Conversion. Zhouhua Sun, Zhe-Hui Zhang, Tong-Qi Yuan, Xiaohong Ren, and Zeming Rong. ACS Catalysis, 2021, 11 (16), pp 10508–10536. DOI: 10.1021/acscatal.1c02433
  13. Advances and Challenges in the Valorization of Bio-Oil: Hydrodeoxygenation Using Carbon-Supported Catalysts. Tomás Cordero-Lanzac, José Rodríguez-Mirasol, Tomás Cordero, and Javier Bilbao. Energy Fuels, 2021, 35 (21), pp 17008–17031. DOI: 10.1021/acs.energyfuels.1c01700
  14. Review of Synthetic Approaches toward the Synthesis of Cariprazine, an Antipsychotic Drug. Siddhanath D. Bhosle, Shivanand V. Image, Balraju Gangapuram, Gyanchander Eppa, RRajesh S. Bhossal, and Jhillu Singh Yadav. Org. Process Res. Dev, 2022, 26 (3) 493-507. DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.1c00488

Cancer-Sniffing Worms

The Spring 2022 National American Chemical Society (ACS) meeting held in San Diego, California, was a hybrid meeting that featured a wide range of science topics. The offerings showcased the vast diversity of the chemical sciences and the increasingly integrated nature of the projects. 

Most people would not be surprised that dogs can be trained to sniff out cancer, but few would consider that a microscopic nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, might be used as an early detection method for lung cancer. Researchers at the Myongji University in Korea have shown that C. elegans does seem to prefer the smell of lung cancer cells. When placed on a microfluidic chip the size of a microscope slide, with lung cancer cells on one side and healthy cells on the other, the microscopic worms move toward the cancerous cells. Shin Sik Choi’s group hypothesizes that the flowery smell of the cancer cells is similar to the worm’s favorite food. They have also used urine samples from healthy people and those with lung cancer; again, the C. elegans migrated toward the urine from cancer patients. Just like using dogs, C. elegans provides a noninvasive way of detecting cancer at the earliest stages, when it is more treatable—but with an organism much easier to maintain than dogs. Researchers plan to test the usefulness of analyzing urine, saliva, and breath in these microfluidic devices containing C. elegans in clinical trials designed to detect early-stage lung and other cancers.

News briefing from the meeting:

https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2022/march/worm-on-a-chip-device-could-someday-help-diagnose-lung-cancer.html

 

Related American Chemical Society publications on this topic:

Japan harnesses creepy-crawlies
Katsumori Matsuoka

Exploring Living Multicellular Organisms, Organs, and Tissues Using Microfluidic Systems
Venkataragavalu Sivagnanam and Martin A. M. Gijs

Effect of Cannabidiol on the Neural Glyoxalase Pathway Function and Longevity of Several C. elegans Strains Including a C. elegans Alzheimer’s Disease Model
Joel Frandsen and Prabagaran Narayanasamy

 

Introducing Dr. Elena Galoppini, Deputy Editor of ACS Applied Optical Materials

Elena Galoppini graduated with a Laurea in Chimica (MSc) from the Università di Pisa, Italy, in 1989 and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Chicago in 1994, with Professor Philip E. Eaton. Following a two-year Postdoctoral Associate appointment at the University of Texas Austin with Professor Marye Anne Fox, in 1996 she began her independent research career at Rutgers University-Newark, where she is currently Distinguished Professor.

Dr. Elena Galoppini

At Rutgers, Prof. Galoppini has served as the Graduate Program Coordinator of the Department of Chemistry from 2016-2019, and over the years she has been Visiting Professor at several institutions including the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm in Sweden and the University of Padova in Italy. In 2019 she was the recipient of a Rutgers Board of Trustees Award for Excellence in Research.

Prof. Galoppini has served on the Advisory Editorial Board of Langmuir from 2007-2010 and is the author of 100 peer-reviewed articles in fundamental and applied research areas, with a primary focus on synthesis of functional bridging units for binding organic chromophores to inorganic semiconductors.

I recently spoke with Dr. Galoppini to learn more about her plans for ACS Applied Optical Materials.

Welcome to the ACS Publications Team, Dr. Galoppini, and congratulations on your new role as the Founding Deputy Editor of ACS Applied Optical Materials. Can you tell us a bit about what drew you to accepting a leadership position with this new journal?

Thank you. Firstly, I want to say that I am honored to be entrusted with this responsibility, and that I am absolutely excited to be the Founding Deputy Editor of ACS Applied Optical Materials, one of the two new journals added in 2022 to the ACS Applied Materials portfolio.

I was drawn to accepting this position because it is an opportunity to contribute in a creative way to the field of optical materials, and in a manner that is entirely new to me. After many years in academic research, the editorial role is a new direction and poses a fresh challenge.  In fact, I feel the same energy and sense of possibilities as when I was a new Assistant Professor, and entered my empty laboratory space for the first time. 

What are you most excited about as the journal opens for submissions?

It is exciting to be part of a perfectly timed initiative by ACS that meets the growing interest in optical materials. In the past five years, publications in this area have sharply increased. ACS Applied Optical Materials, with a focus on applications, will complement other ACS publications that are covering more fundamental aspects of the interactions between light and matter.  

Second, the journal is part of the ACS Applied Materials portfolio, a family of journals encompassing the areas of interfaces, energy, nanoscience, biomaterials, polymers and electronics, and that this year has been expanded to include engineering and optical materials. There is great collegiality between this group of Deputy Editors, and for this reason I anticipate excellent opportunities for future collaborations on Special Issues, Editorials, and other initiatives that are interdisciplinary and cross-cutting the areas of interest among the ACS Applied Materials journals.  

What kind of research reports are of particular interest to you? Are there specific challenges you hope articles in this journal can seek to address?

The field of optical materials is broad, and we welcome high quality, interdisciplinary manuscripts reporting research on emerging applications, and that provide mechanistic insight on optical devices functions.  From a personal perspective, I find fascinating the role of interfaces and how they can influence and control the properties and functions of optical materials and devices.  

A specific challenge that I hope the journal can address will be to identify emerging areas of interest in the multifaceted discipline of optical materials, and then highlight them in the journal.  To this end, it will be essential the input of the Associate Editors and of the Advisory Editorial Board members.  Since they come from different scientific backgrounds, offer complementary expertise, and represent different geographical regions, they will be able to address this challenge from a variety of perspectives.

Do you have any advice for authors seeking to publish their papers with you?

My first suggestion to an author is to look at the journal scope and, as issues will be published following the launch, read the articles and become familiar with the type of research published in ACS Applied Optical Materials. This will ensure that the work that you seek to publish in ACS Applied Optical Materials fits within the scope of the journal.

Secondly, I recommend making a clear connection to how the research presented in your manuscript can advance applications, demonstrate new functions, or be integrated in a device. ACS Applied Optical Materials, as the rest of the ACS Applied Materials portfolio, focuses on high quality research of an applied nature. It is not necessary to directly demonstrate an application, but you should emphasize this connection and put your work in this kind of context.

What opportunities in your field excite you the most?

One of the most exciting opportunities has been collaborating with colleagues who come from completely different scientific backgrounds from mine, and are outside my field. I am at core an organic chemist, and the most rewarding collaborations have been with physicists, physical chemists, and theoreticians.  Everybody learns something new, and together we expand and develop new ideas in a manner that would never have been possible.

What do you think are the non-scientific challenges facing your field?

In my experience, science is generally poorly communicated to the public, and conveying the positive impact of chemistry on society is an enduring challenge.  For instance, undergraduate students taking their first organic chemistry course tend to consider it an obstacle, and anticipate chemistry to be a dry and abstract subject. Fortunately, in academia we have the opportunity to change this perception. We can help students realize that chemistry studies stimulate new ways of thinking, illustrate how chemistry can benefit society, and involve undergraduates in research.

A second challenge is that pursuing a research active academic career has become more complex and stressful.  Applying for funding has turned into an increasingly time consuming and bureaucratic process, and faculty can become overwhelmed with other tasks that have little to do with science. This trend may discourage some talented graduate students and postdocs from pursuing an academic career. 

Apart from materials chemistry, what are you passionate about?

My enthusiasm for working with graduate, undergraduate students and postdocs, and mentoring them in a research setting has never diminished. Seeing young researchers grow scientifically and personally over the years, and then start their own independent career is one of the greatest satisfactions of working in academia.  In my opinion, this one of the greatest contributions a scientist can make. Not to mention that working with young people keeps you young … well, at least young at heart!

About the Journal

ACS Applied Optical Materials is an international and interdisciplinary forum to publish original experimental and theoretical, including simulation and modeling, research in optical materials, complementing the ACS Applied Materials portfolio. With a focus on innovative applications, ACS Applied Optical Materials also complements and expands the scope of existing ACS publications that focus on fundamental aspects of the interaction between light and matter in materials science including ACS Photonics, Macromolecules, The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ACS Nano and Nano Letters.

Visit the journal website to learn more about the scope, to view the author guidelines or to submit your manuscript. Sign up to receive journal e-alerts to receive the first Issue straight to your inbox.

View selected publications from Dr. Galoppini

 

 

Call for Papers: Forum on Recent Advances in Biomaterials Research in the East Asia Pacific Region

In 2023, ACS Applied Bio Materials (CiteScore 4.9 in 2021) will publish a Special Issue showcasing recent research advances from teams in the East Asia Pacific Region. Do you have a research report to include? Submit your manuscript by February 10, 2023.

ACS Applied Bio Materials began publication in 2018 with strong representation of researchers in  the East Asia Pacific region: approximately 50% of our total number of articles published. By 2021, articles from this region increased to approximately 53%, demonstrating the volume and quality of research in the field of applied biomaterials.

The Editors of ACS Applied Bio Materials invite you and your team to join them in celebrating the vast and vibrant biomaterials research conducted in the East Asia Pacific region by taking part in this Special Issue.

The editor committee of this Forum:

Prof. Jong Seung Kim, Associate Editor of ACS Applied Bio Materials

Prof. Chaoyong Yang, Associate Editor of ACS Applied Bio Materials

Prof. Hao Yan, Associate Editor of ACS Applied Bio Materials

Prof. Shu Wang, Deputy Editor of ACS Applied Bio Materials

Prof. Kirk Schanze, Editor-in-Chief of ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces

Geographical coverage will include teams with at least one author based at universities and research institutions in the following countries/regions:

  • Australia
  • China
  • Indonesia
  • Japan
  • Republic of Korea
  • Malaysia
  • New Zealand
  • Singapore
  • Taiwan
  • Thailand
  • Vietnam

To join this Special Issue (Forum), please indicate that your manuscript is intended for the forum “Recent Advances in Biomaterials Research in the East Asia Pacific Region” in the cover letter of the submission to ACS Applied Bio Materials.

Areas of particular topical interest include:

  • DNA/RNA delivery materials;
  • Photodynamic/ photothermal therapy materials;
  • Antiviral/Antimicrobial materials & surfaces;
  • Biomaterials for tissue engineering applications.

Manuscripts submitted for consideration for this Special Issue will undergo the same rigorous peer review process expected from ACS journals. Authors whose manuscripts are accepted for publication can expect to be informed within 10 weeks of their submission date.

Other submissions in research areas within the scope of ACS Applied Bio Materials are also welcome. For details of our manuscript types and requirements, please consult the Author Guidelines.

If you have questions about the scope and/or about publishing in ACS Applied Bio Materials, please contact the managing editor Dr. Chengmei Zhong (c_zhong@acs.org).

Applications of Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Data Analytics in Water Environments

ACS ES&T Water welcomes submissions for the upcoming Special Issue “Applications of Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Data Analytics in Water Environments”

The past few years have witnessed the transformative impact of artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), and data analytics in a wide range of applications, such as speech and image recognition, consumer behavior prediction, and self-driving cars. These applications are primarily driven by the tremendous growth in data collection and storage capabilities as well as in computing power.

These powerful tools have also been increasingly applied in the environmental field to assess contaminant toxicity and environmental risks, evaluate the health of water and wastewater infrastructure, examine the fate and transformation of contaminants in different environments, optimize treatment technologies, identify and characterize pollution sources, model water/wastewater treatment processes, predict contaminant activity in treatment systems and the environment, and perform life cycle analysis, to name a few.

This Special Issue Call for Papers from ACS ES&T Water seeks rigorous research articles, reviews, and perspectives on the current progress, research, opportunities and challenges in applying AI/ML and data analytics to solving environmental problems related to water, and to identify research priorities our community should focus on in the near future.

Examples of topics to be covered include, but are not limited to:

  • Big data-informed water/wastewater infrastructure management
  • Characterize sources of pollution and model emissions of various contaminants in different water-involved environments
  • Data mining from various environmental and biological “omics” data to improve data interpretation and facilitate new discoveries
  • Develop quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for biotic/abiotic reactivity, adsorption, uptake, treatment, and toxicity of organic and inorganic compounds
  • Model and predict contaminant levels and conduct risk assessment in natural and engineered water systems
  • Monitor and predict nutrients and contaminants levels in different environmental compartments
  • Predict and optimize treatment efficiencies in various treatment and remediation processes, such as in drinking water, wastewater, and groundwater treatment and site remediation

Submit your manuscript for inclusion

Submit your manuscript for inclusion now

Guest Editors

Jacqueline MacDonald Gibson, Head of the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, USA

Carla Ng, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, USA

Xu Wang, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen, China. Editorial Advisory Board of ACS ES&T Water

Associate and Topic Editors

Ching-Hua Huang, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA

Huichun (Judy) Zhang, Case Western Reserve University, USA

Author Instructions:

To submit your manuscript, please visit the ACS ES&T Water website. Please follow the normal procedures for manuscript submission and when in the ACS Paragon Plus submission site, select the special issue of “Applications of Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Data Analytics in Water Environments.” All manuscripts will undergo rigorous peer review. For additional submission instructions, please see the ACS ES&T Water Author Guidelines.

The deadline for submissions is March 31, 2023.

Submit your manuscript now

Call for Papers: Data Science for Advancing Environmental Science, Engineering, and Technology

There are many environmentally relevant research areas where advances in data science including machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) have been applied to large datasets to better decipher the complex relationships between system variables and system behaviors, leading to new insights on solution development. 

This joint call for papers by Environmental Science & Technology and Environmental Science & Technology Letters seeks contributions on ML and AI research studies in environmental areas that demonstrate the great potential of these approaches to improve, for example, our understanding of natural and engineered environmental systems, towards maintaining a healthy ecosystem, and/or building a circular economy.

Papers are desired that include either novel applications of data science/ML methodologies and approaches adapted for use in environmental datasets, or address knowledge gaps in an important environmental science and technology that were not approachable using standard analysis tools.

Submissions to the Special Issue should demonstrate the “value added” of taking a ML or AI approach over existing approaches.  Submissions should also ensure that the datasets are large and complex enough that ML approaches are necessary and robust, and researchers must go beyond the “black box” of simple agnostic applications of existing algorithms to determine the “best one”. Papers should ideally also allow insights into mechanistic underpinnings of the system being investigated.

To serve as model examples of ML and AI analyses on complex environmental datasets, papers must facilitate reproducibility by adhering to FAIR data principles and demonstrate computational rigor (e.g., discuss model assumptions/limitations, data considerations, cross validation, model performance), and provide ML and AI models and datasets to readers through publicly available data repositories.

Submit your manuscript

Editors:

Greg Lowry, Executive Editor, Environmental Science & Technology

Alexandria Boehm, Associate Editor, Environmental Science & Technology and Environmental Science & Technology Letters

Bryan W. Brooks, Editor-in-Chief, Environmental Science & Technology Letters

Pablo Gago-Ferrero, Topic Editor, Environmental Science & Technology

Guibin Jiang, Associate Editor, Environmental Science & Technology

Gerrad Jones, Topic Editor, Environmental Science & Technology

Qian Liu, Guest Editor

Z. Jason Ren, Topic Editor, Environmental Science & Technology and Environmental Science & Technology Letters

Shuxiao Wang, Associate Editor, Environmental Science & Technology  and Environmental Science & Technology Letters

Julie Zimmerman, Editor-in-Chief, Environmental Science & Technology

 

Author Instructions:

To submit your manuscript, please visit the Environmental Science & Technology or Environmental Science & Technology Letters website. Please follow the normal procedures for manuscript submission and when in the ACS Paragon Plus submission site, select the special issue of Data Science for Advancing Environmental Science, Engineering, and Technology.” All manuscripts will undergo rigorous peer review. For additional submission instructions, please see the Environmental Science & Technology Author Guidelines or the Environmental Science & Technology Letters Author Guidelines.

The deadline for submissions is January 12, 2023.

Celebrating International Day of Light 2022

The International Day of Light a global initiative that provides an annual focal point for the continued appreciation of light and the role it plays in science, culture and art, education, and sustainable development, and in fields as diverse as medicine, communications, and energy. The broad theme of light will allow many different sectors of society worldwide to participate in activities that demonstrates how science, technology, art and culture can help achieve the goals of UNESCO – education, equality, and peace.

May 16 is the anniversary of the first successful operation of the laser in 1960 by physicist and engineer, Theodore Maiman. The laser is a perfect example of how a scientific discovery can yield revolutionary benefits to society in communications, healthcare and many other fields.

In honor of the International Day of Light, Editor-in-Chief Professor Romain Quidant (ETH Zürich) has selected outstanding contributions in quantum photonics, biophotonics, nanophotonics, imaging, devices and energy, published in ACS Photonics.

 

Quantum Photonics

Quantum Nanophotonics in Two-Dimensional Materials 

Machine Learning for Integrated Quantum Photonics 

Femtosecond Laser Writing of Spin Defects in Hexagonal Boron Nitride 

On-Demand Generation of Entangled Photon Pairs in the Telecom C-Band with InAs Quantum Dots 

 

Biophotonics

Dielectric Metasurfaces Enabling Advanced Optical Biosensors 

Resolving the Sequence of RNA Strands by Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy 

Dual Nanoresonators for Ultrasensitive Chiral Detection 

Comparing Transient Oligonucleotide Hybridization Kinetics Using DNA-PAINT and Optoplasmonic Single-Molecule Sensing on Gold Nanorods 

 

Imaging

Terahertz Scanning Tunneling Microscopy for Visualizing Ultrafast Electron Motion in Nanoscale Potential Variations 

Single-Shot Autofocusing of Microscopy Images Using Deep Learning 

3D Imaging Using Extreme Dispersion in Optical Metasurfaces 

Metasurface Optical Characterization Using Quadriwave Lateral Shearing Interferometry 

 

Devices

Nonlinear Optics in Lead Halide Perovskites: Mechanisms and Applications 

Ultrahigh Deep-Ultraviolet Responsivity of a β-Ga2O3/MgO Heterostructure-Based Phototransistor 

Bi2Se3-Functionalized Metasurfaces for Ultrafast All-Optical Switching and Efficient Modulation of Terahertz Waves 

Robust Mode Matching between Structurally Dissimilar Optical Fiber Waveguides 

 

Energy

Photonics for Photovoltaics: Advances and Opportunities 

Light Propagation and Radiative Exciton Transport in Two-Dimensional Layered Perovskite Microwires 

Violating Kirchhoff’s Law of Thermal Radiation in Semitransparent Structures 

Nighttime Radiative Cooling for Water Harvesting from Solar Panels 

 

Nanophotonics

Nanophotonic Structural Colors 

Dielectric Resonant Metaphotonics 

Steering and Encoding the Polarization of the Second Harmonic in the Visible with a Monolithic LiNbO3 Metasurface 

Enhanced Nonlinear Optical Responses of Layered Epsilon-near-Zero Metamaterials at Visible Frequencies 

 

About the Journal

ACS Photonics is an interdisciplinary forum to communicate on the latest advances in the field of photonics, all the way from basic research to applied research and technology. Embracing the transversality of photonics, it connects scientists and technologists from a broad scientific spectrum, at the interface between physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. It also aims at bridging the gap between the academic and industrial worlds.

Learn more about the journal here and sign up to receive e-alerts to get the latest articles straight to your inbox.

Visit journal homepage

Call for Papers: Water Challenges and Solution Opportunities in South Asia, a Rapidly Developing Region of the World

South Asia is one of the most populated regions of the world with a population of nearly two billion people (nearly a quarter of the world’s population) located within 5.1 million square kilometers of land. This creates challenging circumstances for freshwater management and supply for the region.

South Asia experiences a wide diversity of urban and natural water stressors.  There are a diversity of climates across South Asia, though much of the region is heavily dependent on monsoon rainfall, which may be dramatically impacted by climate change.  Despite rapid economic growth in South Asia, relatively sparse information is available on the water situation and technology/policy solutions.

This Special Issue from ACS ES&T Water will provide a high-level overview of the water issues facing South Asia, as well as technological and policy examples of efforts to overcome the regional challenges. Moreover, the Special Issue will set the groundwork for future advancements to maintain water sustainability in this rapidly developing region.

Submit your manuscript for inclusion now.

Editor-in-Chief: Professor Shane Snyder, Nanyang Technological University

Guest Editors:

  • Associate Professor Raj Kumar Gupta, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, India
  • Fazlullah Akhtar, Center for Development Research, University of Bonn, Germany
  • Professor Shameen Jinadasa, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
  • Associate Professor Shukra Raj Paudel, Tribhuvan University, Nepal
  • M. Feisal Rahman, Northumbria University, United Kingdom

Author Instructions:

To submit your manuscript, please visit the ACS ES&T Water website. Please follow the normal procedures for manuscript submission and when in the ACS Paragon Plus submission site, select the special issue of “Water Challenges and Solution Opportunities in South Asia, a Rapidly Developing Region of the World.” All manuscripts will undergo rigorous peer review. For additional submission instructions, please see the ACS ES&T Water Author Guidelines.

South Asia is generally defined as the following countries (in order of population size):  India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, and Maldives.

The deadline for submissions is August 31, 2022. Submit your manuscript now.