Latest Articles

September 22, 2017

ACS Editors’ Choice: Heart Repair Using Nanogel-Encapsulated Human Cardiac Stem Cells

By Jesse Stanchak

This week: Heart repair using nanogel-encapsulated human cardiac stem cells, emphasizing the molecule in macromolecules, the alanine R3 radical — and more! Each and every day, ACS grants free access to a new peer-reviewed research article from one of the Society’s journals. These articles are specially chosen by a team of scientific editors of ACS journals […]

September 22, 2017

Help for Aspiring Scientific Peer Reviewers

By Stephanie Monasky

Peer review is critical to the advancement of science, but few researchers receive formalized education to sharpen their reviewing skills. In fact, a recent survey reported that up to 77% of researchers desire further training. This is astonishing when combined with another study which estimated that over 30 million hours were spent reviewing manuscripts within scientific journals in 2013 […]

September 22, 2017

Self-Folding Electronics Take Shape

By Katherine Bourzac for C&EN

After being peeled from the platform of a three-dimensional printer, a flat electronic component begins to fold its four legs into position. In just a few minutes, it is fully formed and can stand. Researchers can now print self-folding electronic devices like this one thanks to a new polymer ink that builds up mechanical strain […]

September 21, 2017

ACS Chemical Biology’s Laura L. Kiessling Wins 2017 Tetrahedron Prize For Creativity in Organic Chemistry

By Jesse Stanchak

ACS Chemical Biology Editor-in-Chief Laura L. Kiessling is the winner of the 2017 Tetrahedron Prize For Creativity in Organic Chemistry. The award, given by Elsevier and the Board of Executive Editors of the Tetrahedron journal series, recognizes Kiessling’s contributions to organic chemistry, notably her work in chemical glycobiology. Kiessling is the Novartis Professor of Chemistry […]

September 21, 2017

Get Expert Predictions for the 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

By Jesse Stanchak

We won’t know who the winner (or winners) of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry will be until Oct. 4. But if you can’t wait that long — or you just love to speculate — we’ve got a panel of experts who are willing to put forth some educated guesses. Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) has […]

September 21, 2017

Trees with a Probiotic Boost Clean Up a Carcinogen

By Deirdre Lockwood, for C&EN

Planting poplar trees that harbor a secret weapon—pollutant-busting microbes—could help clean up sites contaminated with the carcinogen trichloroethylene, a new study shows. In the first field trial of this approach at a Superfund hazardous waste site, poplar trees boosted by bacteria within their tissues brought groundwater concentrations of TCE to below the maximum contaminant level […]

September 20, 2017

Touching Thermal Receipts May Extend BPA Exposure

By Deirdre Lockwood, for C&EN

When people handle receipts printed on thermal paper containing the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA), the chemical could linger in the body for a week or more, according to a new study. BPA ingested from food, however, is excreted within a day. Jonathan W. Martin of Stockholm University and Jiaying Liu of the University of […]

September 19, 2017

New Videos Ask Scientists: Why is Chemistry Central to What You Do?

By Joseph Graham

In a new series of videos, we visit four chemistry labs in four countries—Germany, Singapore, Taiwan, and the U.S.—and meet four ACS authors who share their passion for advancing science. Take a Closer Look at 4 ASC Authors: Dr. Stefan Laufer, Universität Tübingen Dr. Matthew Wook Chang, National University of Singapore Dr. Hauh-Jyun Candy Chen, […]

September 19, 2017

Making the Diabetes Drug Exenatide More Stable

By Katherine Gammon, for C&EN

Exenatide, a widely used diabetes drug, requires that patients give themselves a subcutaneous injection at least once per week. But because of a new development, less frequent injections might soon be possible. By tweaking one amino acid of exenatide and attaching it to hydrogel microspheres, researchers have developed a longer-acting version and tested it in […]

September 18, 2017

Saying Goodbye to a QSAR Pioneer

By Jesse Stanchak

The chemistry community recently said goodbye to Dr. Toshio Fujita, who helped develop the Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) method along with Corwin Hansch. This method has helped generations of chemists interpret molecular interactions and predict the properties of new molecules. Over the last 50 years, the QSAR method proved vital to chemists looking to discover […]