The Future of Biochemistry: Discoveries on the Horizon

In an insightful article published in Biochemistry in 1987, Nobel Prize winner Arthur Kornberg noted, “Increasingly, young professors in chemistry departments are pursuing problems of biologic significance.” The unique synergy between chemistry and biology has become increasingly apparent and multidimensional over the past 30 years and will continue to grow and deepen as chemists and biologists set their sights on increasingly complex problems.

In that spirit, Biochemistry dedicated a month-long 4-part Special Issue to the “Future of Biochemistry.” The issue focuses on early-career scientists across the globe who are combining an ever-diversifying set of skills and backgrounds to tackle problems of biochemical relevance. This issue celebrates their work and provides a forum to communicate their ideas, visions, and passions, focusing on the discoveries on the horizon.

Read a few examples of the papers featured in these issues: 

Comparative Membrane Proteomics Reveals a Nonannotated E. coli Heat Shock Protein

Biochemistry, 2018, 57 (1), pp 56–60
DOI: 10.1021/acs.biochem.7b00864
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In Vivo Biochemistry: Single-Cell Dynamics of Cyclic Di-GMP in Escherichia coli in Response to Zinc Overload

Biochemistry, 2018, 57 (1), pp 108–116
DOI: 10.1021/acs.biochem.7b00696
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Mapping the Small Molecule Interactome by Mass Spectrometry

Biochemistry, 2018, 57 (2), pp 186–193
DOI: 10.1021/acs.biochem.7b01038
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An Automated Image Analysis Method for Segmenting Fluorescent Bacteria in Three Dimensions

Biochemistry, 2018, 57 (2), pp 209–215
DOI: 10.1021/acs.biochem.7b00839
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Expanding the Scope of Single- and Double-Noncanonical Amino Acid Mutagenesis in Mammalian Cells Using Orthogonal Polyspecific Leucyl-tRNA Synthetases

Biochemistry, 2018, 57 (4), pp 441–445
DOI: 10.1021/acs.biochem.7b00952

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Get a full list of articles in the Special Issue:

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4

 

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