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#ThankAScientist – William L. Jorgensen

#ThankAScientist – William L. Jorgensen

ACS is participating in Thank A Scientist Week by encouraging the ACS community to get to know some of the ACS Editors who are active on Twitter. Tweet your appreciation and get to know more ACS Editors.

William L. Jorgensen is the Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation. You can follow him on Twitter at @jorgensenwl.

His current research includes such areas as the use of modern theoretical methods and computers to solve problems concerning structure and reactivity for organic and biomolecular systems, computer-aided drug design, and the synthesis and testing of anti-infective and anti-proliferative agents.

He is considered a pioneer in the field of computational chemistry. Some of his contributions include the TIP3P and TIP4P water models, the OPLS force field, and his work on free-energy perturbation theory for modeling reactions and molecular recognition in solution. He developed the Optimized Potentials for Liquid State (OPLS) potential functions for organic molecules (including proteins). He pioneered the methodology of developing potential functions by fitting parameters to reproduce the thermodynamic properties of pure liquids, which is now widely used by other researchers.

His honors include the ACS Award for Computers in Chemical & Pharmaceutical Research, Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award, and the Award in Computational Biology from the Intl. Society for Quantum Biology & Pharmacology. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Are you on Twitter? If so, tweet a ‘thank you’ to @jorgensenwl for his work, as part of our Thank a Scientist campaign. Be sure to include the hashtag. #ThankAScientist.

#ThankAScientist – Chad A. Mirkin

ACS is participating in Thank A Scientist Week by encouraging the ACS community to get to know some of the ACS Editors who are active on Twitter. Tweet your appreciation and get to know more ACS Editors.

Chad A. Mirkin is the Associate Editor of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. You can follow him on Twitter at @CHADNANO.

His current research focuses on the development of methods for controlling molecular architecture on the 1-100nm scale and using such structures for inventing technologies that impact chemistry, biology and medicine. His research group is best known for the discovery and development of spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) as well as enabling techniques such as dip-pen nanolithography (DPN), polymer pen lithography (PPL) and beam pen lithography (BPL) – methods that allow scientists to “draw” and create patterns of extraordinary sophistication and complexity on a variety of surfaces using nanoscale pens and chemicals and biological materials as inks.

He is the Director of the International Institute for Nanotechnology and the Rathmann Professor of Chemistry, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Medicine at Northwestern University.

He is a member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science & Technology, and a member of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. His recent awards include the Wilhelm Exner Medal, the William H. Nichols Medal Award, and the Dan David Prize.

Are you on Twitter? If so, tweet a ‘thank you’ to @CHADNANO for his work, as part of our Thank a Scientist campaign. Be sure to include the hashtag #ThankAScientist.

#ThankAScientist – Gunda I. Georg

ACS is participating in Thank A Scientist Week by encouraging the ACS community to get to know some of the ACS Editors who are active on Twitter. Tweet your appreciation and get to know more ACS Editors.

Gunda I. Georg is the co-Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. You can follow her on Twitter at @ Gunda_i.

Georg and her group are involved in the design, semisynthesis, total synthesis, and evaluation of biologically active agents. Current therapeutic areas include cancer, male contraception, epilepsy, and Alzheimer’s disease. These projects require the development of synthetic methods, synthesis of natural products, and structure-activity studies aimed at improving the therapeutic efficacy of lead compounds, including natural products, and hits from high throughput screening.

She holds the Robert Vince Endowed Chair and McKnight Presidential Chair and directs its Institute for Therapeutics Discovery & Development, which she established. She serves on the editorial advisory boards of ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters and the Journal of Organic Chemistry.

Her awards include the 2008 Distinguished Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship in the Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Houston College of Pharmacy, the 2005 Loyd E. Harris Lecture, School of Pharmacy, University of Oklahoma, and the 2005 George Lesher Lecture in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Rensselear Polytechnic Institute.

Are you on Twitter? If so, tweet a ‘thank you’ to ‪ @Gunda_i for her work, as part of our Thank a Scientist campaign. Be sure to include the hashtag #ThankAScientist.

 

 

#ThankAScientist – David Sedlak

ACS is participating in Thank A Scientist Week by encouraging the ACS community to get to know some of the ACS Editors who are active on Twitter. Tweet your appreciation and get to know more ACS Editors.

David Sedlak is the Editor-in-Chief of Environmental Science & Technology and Environmental Science & Technology Letters. You can follow him on Twitter at @Water4point0.

His research focuses on the fate of trace organic contaminants in the urban water cycle. Within this area, he has investigated advanced treatment systems employed in potable water reuse and managed natural systems, such as constructed wetlands and storm water harvesting systems. He also has developed new approaches for characterizing and remediating organic contaminants in groundwater and soil.

He is the Plato Malozemoff Chair in Mineral Engineering in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at UC Berkeley. He is also co-director of the Berkeley Water Center, and the deputy director of the National Science Foundation’s Engineering Research Center for Re-Inventing the Nation’s Urban Water Infrastructure (ReNUWIt).

His honors include the 2014 Athalie Richardson Irvine Clarke Prize for Excellence in Water Research, National Academy of Engineering Gilbreth Lecturer, Fulbright Senior Scholar (Australia), and the Paul L. Busch Award for Applied Water Research.

Are you on Twitter? If so, tweet a ‘thank you’ to @Water4point0 for his work as part of our Thank a Scientist campaign. Be sure to include the hashtag #ThankAScientist.

 

 

 

#ThankAScientist – John R. Yates III

ACS is participating in Thank A Scientist Week by encouraging the ACS community to get to know some of the ACS Editors who are active on Twitter. Tweet your appreciation and get to know more ACS Editors.

John R. Yates III is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Proteome Research. You can follow him on Twitter at @JohnRYatesIII.

Yates’ research has focused on applied proteomics, protein biochemistry, mass spectrometry, and informatics. His work led to significant advances in the proteomics field where techniques he and his team developed have become a resource to many researchers in the scientific community. He was the lead inventor of SEQUEST software, which correlates tandem mass spectrometry data to sequences in the database, and developer of the shotgun proteomics technique for protein mixture analyses.

He is the Ernest W. Hahn Professor of Chemical Physiology with a joint appointment in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience. Before being appointed as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Proteome Research, he served as an Associate Editor for Analytical Chemistry.

Some of his recent awards include the Ralph N. Adams Award in Bioanalytical Chemistry in 2015, the American Chemical Society Award in Analytical Chemistry in 2015, and being listed as the #1 on List of Most Influential in Analytical Chemistry according to The Analytical Scientist in 2013.

Are you on Twitter? If so, tweet a ‘thank you’ to @JohnRYatesIII for his work, as part of our Thank a Scientist campaign. Be sure to include the hashtag #ThankAScientist.

 

#ThankAScientist – Paul Chirik

ACS is participating in Thank A Scientist Week by encouraging the ACS community to get to know some of the ACS Editors who are active on Twitter. Tweet your appreciation and get to know more ACS Editors.

Paul Chirik is the Editor-in-Chief of the Organometallics. You can follow him on Twitter at @pchirik.

His current research is focused on the application of organometallic chemistry to catalysis and sustainable chemistry. The area of longest standing interest is the conversion of molecular nitrogen to more value-added compounds that reduce the fossil fuel dependency and CO2 footprint associated with industrial ammonia synthesis. A second area of focus is base metal catalysis, whereby earth abundant metals such as iron and cobalt are used to promote new bond-forming reactions relevant to the synthesis of flavors and fragrances, pharmaceuticals, silicones and petrochemicals.

He is the Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Chemistry at Princeton University. He is a David and Lucile Packard Fellow in Science and Engineering, a Cottrell Scholar of the Research Corporation and a Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar.

He was also named a Bessel Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and enjoyed a productive collaboration with Professor Karl Weighardt of the Max Planck Institute of Bioinorganic Chemistry in Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany. In 2009, he was named an Arthur C. Cope Scholar awardee and was recognized with the Blavatnik Award from the New York Academy of Sciences.

Are you on Twitter? If so, tweet a ‘thank you’ to @pchirik for his work, as part of our Thank a Scientist campaign. Be sure to include the hashtag #ThankAScientist.

 

#ThankAScientist – William B. Tolman

ACS is participating in Thank A Scientist Week by encouraging the ACS community to get to know some of the ACS Editors who are active on Twitter. Tweet your appreciation and get to know more ACS Editors.

William B. Tolman is the Editor-in-Chief of Inorganic Chemistry. You can follow him on Twitter at @WBTolman.

His research encompasses synthetic bioinorganic and organometallic/polymer chemistry. His work aims to gain a fundamental structural, spectroscopic, and mechanistic understanding of metalloprotein active sites of biological and environmental importance via the synthesis, characterization, and examination of the reactivity of model complexes. Key advances have been made in understanding copper protein active sites through his studies of the reactions of copper(I) complexes with dioxygen and of the properties of copper–sulfur complexes. The goal of his research in the organometallic/polymer area is to synthesize and characterize a variety of metal complexes for use as catalysts for the polymerization of cyclic esters.

Tolamn is the Distinguished McKnight University Professor at the University of Minnesota. He is a member of the Centers for Metals in Biocatalysis and Sustainable Polymers and currently is serving as Chair of the Department of Chemistry.

His honors include the Searle Scholars, NSF National Young Investigator, Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation Teacher–Scholar, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Awards, the Buck-Whitney Medal from the American Chemical Society, and a Research Award from the Humboldt Foundation. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Chemical Society.

Are you on Twitter? If so, tweet a ‘thank you’ to @WBTolman for his work as part of our Thank a Scientist campaign. Be sure to include the hashtag # #ThankAScientist.

 

#ThankAScientist – Laura L. Kiessling

ACS is participating in Thank A Scientist Week by encouraging the ACS community to get to know some of the ACS Editors who are active on Twitter. Tweet your appreciation and get to know more ACS Editors.

Laura L. Kiessling is the Editor-in-Chief of ACS Chemical Biology. You can follow her on Twitter at @ChemicalBiology.

Her interdisciplinary research focuses on elucidating and exploiting the mechanisms of cell surface recognition processes, including those that involve of protein–saccharide recognition and oligosaccharide function. Another major interest of her group is multivalency and its role in recognition and signal transduction. Her research combines tools from organic synthesis, polymer chemistry, structural biology, microbiology, and molecular and cell biology.

Kiessling is a professor in the MIT Department of Chemistry. She is a member of the Editorial Board for Chemistry & Biology and Annual Reviews of Biochemistry. She serves as a USA Section Head for Chemical Biology, Faculty of 1000 and is a member of the Keystone Meetings Advisory Board.

Her recent awards include the James W. Taylor Excellence in Teaching Award, the Claude S. Hudson Award, the Murray S. Goodman Memorial Prize, the Albert Hofmann Award, University of Zurich, Alfred Bader Award in Bioinorganic or Bioorganic Chemistry and Alexander M. Cruickshank Award. She is a member of the American Philosophical Society.

Are you on Twitter? If so, tweet a ‘thank you’ to @ChemicalBiology for her work, as part of our Thank a Scientist campaign. Be sure to include the hashtag #ThankAScientist.

 

#ThankAScientist – Jillian Buriak

ACS is participating in Thank A Scientist Week by encouraging the ACS community to get to know some of the ACS Editors who are active on Twitter. Tweet your appreciation and get to know more ACS Editors.

Jillian Buriak is the Editor-in-Chief of Chemistry of Materials. You can follow her on Twitter at @JBuirak.

Buriak is Professor of Chemistry, Canada Research Chair of Nanomaterials, and Senior Research Officer of the National Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Alberta, Canada. She previously served as Associate Editor for ACS Nano.

Her research interests encompass nanoscience and materials chemistry, with a focus on the design, characterization, and integration of nanomaterials and semiconductor materials for applications ranging from photovoltaics and renewable energy to nanomedicine and catalysis.

She is known for her work developing flexible, lightweight, silicon-free solar cells made from nanoparticles. By spraying a plastic surface with the nanomaterials and running it through a laminator, she’s able to create a transparent electrode that act as solar cells. Since the cells are flexible, they could be incorporated into any number of surfaces, such as clothing or window blinds.

Dr. Buriak is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (FRSC), and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (UK). She is the recipient of the ACS Pure Chemistry Award, the Fresenius Award, the E. W. R. Steacie Memorial Fellowship, and the 2005 Rutherford Memorial Medal in Chemistry.

Are you on Twitter? If so, tweet a ‘thank you’ to @JBuirak for her work as part of our Thank a Scientist campaign. Be sure to include the hashtag #ThankAScientist.

#ThankAScientist — Carolyn Bertozzi

ACS is participating in Thank A Scientist Week by encouraging the ACS community to get to know some of the ACS Editors who are active on Twitter. Tweet your appreciation and get to know more ACS Editors.

Carolyn Bertozzi is the founding Editor-in-Chief of ACS Central Science. You can follow her on Twitter at ‪@CarolynBertozzi.

Bertozzi’s research focuses on creating new technologies for the development of medicines and diagnostics that will improve human health. This work spans a number of technologies and approaches at the interface of chemistry and biology. Bertozzi’s work at the interface of chemistry and biology gave rise to bioorthogonal chemistry, a means for researchers to chemically modify molecules within living systems. She founded the field in the mid-1990s and coined the name in 2003 to describe reactions that do not interact or interfere with cell biology. Her studies have resulted in such innovations as molecular imaging and in situ drug assembly.

Bertozzi is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Chemical & Systems Biology and Radiology (by courtesy) at Stanford University, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. Carolyn is a founding scientist of Stanford ChEM-H, a new initiative chaired by Chaitan Khosla, which draws together faculty from many disciplines with the goal of improving human health.

Among her recent honors, she is the 2017 recipient of the Arthur C. Cope Award, the 2016 winner of the NAS Award in Chemical Sciences, and a member of the 2017 National Inventors Hall of Fame.

Are you on Twitter? If so, tweet a ‘thank you’ to ‪@CarolynBertozzi for her work as part of our Thank a Scientist campaign. Be sure to include the hashtag #ThankAScientist.